What Day Did Judas Betray Jesus

Why Jesus Was Betrayed by Judas Iscariot

Judas Iscariot sealed his own fate from the minute he planted a kiss on Jesus of Nazareth in the Garden of Gethsemane: he would go down in history as the world’s most renowned traitor. The identification of Jesus by the Jewish authorities, on the other hand, set in motion a series of events that would become the cornerstones of the Christian faith: Jesus’s arrest and trial, his crucifixion, and ultimately his resurrection, all of which are collectively known as the Passion of Christ. WATCH: JESUS: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE Vault In light of how little we truly know about Judas Iscariot from the Bible, he continues to be one of the most enigmatic–and important–figures in Jesus’s life narrative to this day.

Who Was Judas Iscariot? What We Know from the Bible

Despite the fact that the Bible provides little details concerning Judas’s upbringing, he is listed as one of Jesus’ closest disciples, or apostles, in all four of the New Testament’s canonical gospels. Intriguingly, Judas Iscariot is the only one of the apostles who is (possibly) identified by his hometown in the Bible, which is a unique distinction. Some academics believe that his surname “Iscariot” is derived from the town of Queriot (also known as Kerioth), which is located south of Jerusalem in the Judean Hills.

The northern section of Israel, or Roman Palestine, is where Jesus hails from.

However, there is nothing in the Bible that links Judas to the Sicarii, and the Sicarii were only discovered to be active after Judas’ death.

Because people are always attempting to justify why he would have done anything like this.

At the Last Supper, Jesus announced his betrayal to the assembled guests. Judas is seen sitting on the other side of the table from where the action is taking place. Images courtesy of David Lees/Corbis/VCG/Getty Images

Possible Motives for Judas Iscariot’s Betrayal

According to the Gospel of John, Jesus revealed to his followers over the Last Supper that one of them would betray him if they didn’t repent of their actions. In response to their question, Jesus responded, “It is the person to whom I offer this piece of bread after I have dipped it in the dish.” Later, Judas, who was recognized as the “son of Simon Iscariot,” was given a piece of bread that had been dipped in a dish by the apostle. “Satan came into Judas when he received the piece of bread,” the Bible says.

The Gospel of Luke, like the Gospel of John, attributed Judas’ treachery to Satan’s influence rather than simple avarice, as was the case in the Gospel of John.

In the words of Cargill, “there have always been some who have sought to attach Judas’s treachery to the fact that he had a love of money.” Others have speculated that his disloyal behavior was motivated by a greater political purpose.

Alternately, according to Cargill, Judas (along with Jewish authorities at the time) might have perceived a rebellion as potentially dangerous for the Jewish people in general, similar to what happened when Rome destroyed Sepphoris earlier in the first century: “Maybe he decided to hand Jesus over, in effect, to put a stop to a larger rebellion.” More information may be found at: Why Did Pontius Pilate Order Jesus’ Execution?

What Happened After That

No matter what his motivations were, Judas led troops to the Garden of Gethsemane, where he recognized Jesus as the Messiah by kissing him and addressing him as “Rabbi.” (Matthew 14:44–46) As recorded in the Gospel of Matthew, Judas instantly repented of his conduct and returned the 30 pieces of silver to the church’s treasurer, declaring, “I have sinned by betraying the blood of innocent men and women.” When the authorities dismissed Judas, he left the money on the floor and committed himself by hanging himself from the ceiling fan (Matthew 27:3-8).

  • The Bible contains several different versions of Judas’s death.
  • The Book of Acts, on the other hand, portrays his death as more akin to a spontaneous combustion than anything else.
  • As a result, he proceeded into a field, where he “fell headlong into the center of it and burst asunder, with all his guts gushing out” as a result of “falling headlong into it” (Acts 1:18).
  • Because of Judas’ treachery, Jesus was arrested, tried, and executed by crucifixion, following which he was raised from the dead.
  • However, the name “Judas” came to be associated with betrayal in a variety of languages, and Judas Iscariot would come to be depicted as the prototypical traitor and false friend in Western art and literature as a result.

MOVE ON TO THE NEXT PAGE: Mary Magdalene: Prostitute, Wife, or None of the Above?

Was Judas Really That Bad?

According to Joan Acocellawrote in The New Yorker in 2006, “the most essential aspect about Judas, aside from his betrayal of Jesus, is his association with anti-Semitism.” Judas has been held up as a symbol of Jews by Christians almost since Christ’s crucifixion, representing what they believe to be the Jewish people’s deviousness and thirst for money, among other ethnic vices.” Due to the historical inclination to associate Judas with anti-Semitic stereotypes, following the horrors of the Holocaust, this significant Biblical figure has been given a second look, and his image has even been somewhat restored in some quarters of the world.

When writing about Judas in 1997, Canadian biblical historian Professor William Klassen asserted that many elements of his betrayal had been fabricated or embellished by early Christian church leaders, particularly as the Church began to drift away from Judaism.

What Is the Gospel of Judas?

As Joan Acocellaw noted in The New Yorker in 2006, “the most essential detail about Judas, aside from his betrayal of Jesus, is his association with anti-Semitism.” The apostle Judas has been held up as a symbol of the Jews almost since the time of Christ’s death, representing their alleged deviousness, their greed for money, and other ethnic vices. Following the tragedies of the Holocaust, the historical inclination to associate Judas with anti-Semitic stereotypes resulted in a reexamination of this pivotal Biblical figure, as well as a measure of rehabilitation of his image.

A Timeline of Holy Week — Hope On Demand

“Holy week” refers to the final week of Jesus’ life, which is celebrated every year on April 14th. Christian communities all throughout the world prepare emotionally and spiritually for Easter Sunday, when they will commemorate Christ’s sacrifice and final victory over sin and death. The week preceding Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection is known as the “week of preparation.” According to the Gospels, the following is a timeline of the events during Holy Week.

SUNDAY

  • As Jesus approaches Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, he does so triumphantly. He who comes in the name of the Lord will be blessed
  • Hosanna in the highest is his cry. Matthew 21:42-43

MONDAY

  • When Jesus enters the temple, he drives out everyone who is engaged in buying and selling. The Bible says, “‘My house shall be considered a place of prayer,'” says the author. Matthew 21:42-43

TUESDAY

  • When Jesus is confronted, He responds with the greatest demands. “With all your heart, love the Lord your God. “You should love your neighbor as you love yourself.” Matthew 21:21- 25:21

WEDNESDAY

  • In this passage, Jesus informs His followers that He will be taken from them and crucified. The chief priests and elders devise a plan to covertly capture and assassinate Jesus. Matthew 26: In return for money, Judas offers to betray Jesus and betrayal begins. Jesus is later prepared for burial by Mary, who anoints him with oil in preparation for His death. (Luke 22:22
  • John 12:12)

THURSDAY

  • The Passover meal is a time for Jesus to share with His followers “As Jesus said, “This is My body laid down for you. this is My blood shed for you.” Luke 22: During Passover, Jesus humbles himself by washing the feet of his followers. He goes on to say, “”One of you will betray Me,” Jesus says, referring to Judas. “Jesus proceeds to instruct His followers in John 13,” says the Lord “ove one another as much as I have loved each of you. Men will recognize you as My disciples as a result of this.” In John 13:34-35, Jesus also foretells Peter’s denial of Christ. “I swear to you that the rooster will not crow until you have refused Me three times,” says the Lord. 13:38 (John 13:38)
  • The disciples are sleeping when Judas approaches with a huge throng armed with swords and clubs, and Jesus prays in anguish to the Father, “Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me
  • Yet not my will, but Yours be done.” With a kiss, he violates Jesus’ trust (a secret signal to the crowd). When Jesus is captured and carried to the palace of the high priest, Matthew 26:47-50 describes what happens. It is necessary for this to occur in order for the Scriptures to be fulfilled. 26:54-58
  • Matthew 26:54-58

FRIDAY

  • Overnight, the chief priests condemned Jesus to death for claiming to be the Messiah, the Son of the Living God. In accordance with prophecy, Peter rejected Jesus three times before dawn
  • Judas returns to the religious authorities, confessing, “I have sinned and betrayed innocent blood.” He tosses the money away, flees, and hangs himself in the process. Matthew 27: Jesus is brought before Pilate and Herod, and neither finds fault with him. Despite the fact that Jesus is insulted and battered, the mob yells, “CRUCIFY HIM!” Luke 23:21
  • Pilate offers the people a choice: either liberate Barabbas (a murderer) or release Jesus (who is innocent) (who was found not guilty of any offense). Matthew 27: The mob decides to free Barabbas from prison. Pilate releases Jesus into their custody. It is said that they placed a robe and crown of thorns on Jesus’ head
  • The throng mocked him. “Hail, King of the Jews!” exclaims the crowd. In the process of leading Jesus to Calvary, they spit and beat him, laying the cross on His back. Once they get at Calvary, they nail Jesus on the cross. “Father, forgive them, for they do not understand what they are doing,” Jesus says. In Luke 23:33-34, a thief is hung between two other thieves, and one of them replies, ” “e are subjected to appropriate punishment. He has done nothing illegal in the eyes of the law. Please keep me in mind in Your reign.” Jesus responds, “Truly, I tell you that today you will be with Me in Paradise,” and he is taken to heaven ” Jesus is crucified in the middle of the day, according to Luke 23:43. At midday, darkness falls over the region and lasts for three hours. The Bible says in Mark 15:33 that Jesus laments, “My God, why have You left me?” He has been given wine to drink, and with His dying breath, He says, “It is finished.” The Temple curtain (which separates the people from God) is ripped in half in an instant. The earth trembles, rocks fracture, and tombs shattered open as a result. When the centurion and his companions saw these things, they became fearful, shouting, “Surely this guy was the Son of God!” Matthew 27:51
  • Matthew 27:54 (KJV). Soldiers arrive and smash the legs of the two robbers in half. Instead, they penetrate Jesus’ side, creating a torrential outpouring of blood and water. “Not one of His bones will be shattered,” according to John 19:34, which fulfilled the Scripture. “He was wounded in order to atone for our sins.” Isaiah 53:5
  • John 19:36
  • Later that night, a man called Joseph approaches Jesus and requests for his body. A piece of fabric is wrapped around the body, which is then placed into an unoccupied graveyard. Matthew 23:53
  • Luke 23:54
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SATURDAY

  • In the blink of an eye, the chief priests executed Jesus for claiming to be the Son of God. Judas walks back to the religious elders and confesses, “I have sinned and betrayed innocent blood.” Peter rejected Jesus three times before daybreak, as promised
  • He tosses the money away, flees, and hangs himself in a nearby forest. Christ is brought before Pilate and Herod, yet neither man deems him to be guilty. But the crowd yells, “CRUCIFY HIM!” as Jesus is insulted and assaulted. The audience is given an option between freeing Barabbas (a murderer) and releasing Jesus (Luke 23:21). (who was found not guilty of any offense). Matthew 27: The people vote to have Barabbas released from prison. Pilate hands up Jesus to the authorities in charge of the investigation. It is said that they placed a robe and crown of thorns on Jesus’ head
  • The multitude mocked Jesus. “Hail, King of the Jews!” exclaims the audience. It is at Calvary that they beat and spit on Him, laying the cross on His back as they take Him there. It is at Calvary that they nail Jesus on the cross. As Jesus says, “Father forgive them since they do not know what they are doing.” One of the robbers, hanging amid two others in Luke 23:33-34, threatens, “I’m going to kill you.” “I believe that we have been fairly punished. He has done nothing wrong in the eyes of the public. Please keep me in mind in Your reign.” Jesus responds, “Truly, I tell you that today you will be with Me in Paradise,” and he is taken to heaven ” Jesus is crucified in the middle of the day, according to Luke 23:43. At midday, darkness descends upon the country and lasts for three hours. “My God, why have You left me?” Jesus laments in Mark 15:33. He has been given wine to drink, and with His final breath, He says, “It is finished.” The Temple curtain (which separates the people from God) is torn in half in an instant. During the earthquake, the earth shakes, rocks shatter, and tombstones burst into flames. When the centurion and his companions saw these things, they became alarmed and said, “Surely this guy was the Son of God!” Matthew 27:51
  • Matthew 27:54 (King James Version). A group of soldiers arrives and breaks both robbers’ legs in half. As an alternative, they puncture Jesus’ side, prompting a torrent of blood and water to spill out. “Not one of His bones will be shattered,” according to John 19:34, which fulfilled Scripture. “He was wounded in order to atone for our sins,” says the author. A man called Joseph approaches Jesus in the middle of the night and requests his body. (See Isaiah 53:5 and John 19:36.) He covers it in fabric and buries it in a tomb that had previously been empty. 23:53 in the Gospel of Luke

SUNDAY

  • When Mary and the others get at the tomb, they discover that the stone has been rolled away. One of the angels informs us that “Jesus is not here
  • He has risen from the dead, exactly as He said.” Mark 16:1–4
  • Peter and John race to the grave to confirm their suspicions. They discover Jesus’ burial clothes, but His corpse has been removed from the scene. They return to their house, still in astonishment
  • Outside the tomb, Jesus appears to Mary Magdalene. “Can you tell me why you’re crying? On the way to Emmaus, Jesus comes to Cleopas and a buddy and tells them, “Go to My brethren and tell them that I am ascending to My Father.” Their eyes are awakened, and they recognize Jesus, and they report back to the others. Jesus also pays a visit to the disciples, who are terrified of him. “Why are you in doubt?” he says emphatically. “Take a look at My hands and feet
  • It is I!” says the author. Luke 24:44-46

BUT the story doesn’t end here …

  • For 40 days, Jesus appears to a large number of people. “Go then and make disciples of all countries.”, He advises His followers. “After the Lord Jesus had spoken to them, He was carried up into heaven, and He sat at the right hand of God,” says Matthew 28:19-20. (Matthew 16:19) The disciples are then visited by angels, who reassure them that Jesus will come once more to earth! (See Acts 1:10-11.)

Jesus’ labor on the cross was done for you, the person reading this. All of your sins have been forgiven. Allow His tale to blaze a path through your heart and motivate you to spread the Good News!

Judas Betrays Jesus – Bible Story

The story of Judas betraying Jesus is told in all four gospels, and it is a well-known biblical event. It is widely recognized in Christian theology as one of the most serious instances of treason ever to have occurred. There are various possible theories for Judas’ betrayal of Jesus, including bribery and demonic possession, that differ throughout the gospels. According to the Gospels, Jesus knew about Judas’ treachery and gave his consent to it. One perspective is that Jesus authorized the betrayal because it would allow God’s plan to be realized, while another is that Jesus was ultimately doomed to be crucified as part of God’s plan regardless of the betrayal.

  • As he sits down to eat at the Last Supper, Jesus predicts that “one of you will betray me,” a reference to Judas Iscariot.
  • He offers to lead them to Jesus in exchange for a payment of 30 silver coins.
  • “Greetings, Rabbi!” says the narrator.
  • “Fellow, what is your purpose in being here?” says the speaker.
  • (Matthew 26:49; Matthew 26:50) “Judas, are you betraying the Son of Man with a kiss?” Jesus asks, responding to his own inquiry.
  • “Should we strike with the sword, Lord?” they inquire of the lord.
  • Malchus’ ear is caressed by Jesus, who uses it to cure the wound.

The reason why Jesus is willing to be taken is because, as he says, “How else would the Scriptures be fulfilled that state that it must take place this way?” (See Matthew 26:52 for further information.) This ultimately leads to Christ’s trial and execution on the cross.

Why Is Judas Such a Tragic Character in the Bible?

With his notorious betrayal of Jesus, Judas has become one of the most well-known biblical figures of all time. Even those who are not familiar with the Bible use him as an example of devious behavior in their own lives. When we take into consideration what the Bible says about his time with Jesus, his reputation becomes even more bleak.

Who Was Judas in the Bible?

After betraying Jesus, Judas became one of the most well-known biblical characters of all time. His devious behavior is used as an example by even those who are not familiar with the Bible. When we analyze what the Bible has to say about his time with Jesus, his reputation becomes much more bleaker.

Why Did Judas Betray Jesus?

The Bible does not take us directly inside Judas’ thinking, nor does it contain any scenarios in which he attempts to justify his conduct. As a result, it’s difficult to pinpoint exactly what he thought of Jesus when he first began following him, and what happened that caused him to decide to betray his master. However, we do know that in John 6:64-70, Jesus told his disciples that he was aware that some of them did not believe, and that one of them was even a demon. This condemnation shows that there was something basic about Jesus’ teaching that Judas failed to recognize or understand.

  • Due to the fact that others attempted to assassinate Jesus on multiple occasions, Judas must have believed he had something significant to gain by being with Jesus, something that made the danger worthwhile.
  • When it became evident that Jesus was not acting in the manner of a political champion (riding into Jerusalem on a warhorse, murdering Romans), Judas may have rethought his decision about who he wanted to support.
  • He was simply unhappy because if Mary had sold the perfume for the group, he would have accessed the earnings and taken part for himself, according to the author’s interpretation (John 12:6).
  • This scenario implies that Judas was financially gaining from his association with Jesus, and he may have been concerned that Jesus was aware of his stealing because of this association.
  • As blasphemy was claimed by the religious officials (Leviticus 24:16), Judas was probably definitely aware that things were not going to finish with Jesus “making a bargain” and walking away alive from the scene of his betrayal.
  • It was difficult for Pilate to understand what the people were requesting (Luke 23:1-56) (John 19:4-6) because the Romans did not inflict penalties for religious disagreements at that time.

However, it is apparent that Judas was not a psychopath who did not accept responsibility for what he had done in the first place. He eventually came to terms with the truth of his conduct and was grieved by the realization.

Why Is Judas’ Life So Tragic?

Beingtrayal of someone who turns out to be the Messiah is a horrible thing to do, as we all know. However, we don’t usually consider what Judas actually had to accomplish as a member of Jesus’ following, or the circumstances that led up to his betrayal, which made his treachery all the more heartbreaking. When it came to following Jesus, Judas would have given up his lotto do so. According to scholars, Jesus spent around three years in ministry before his death. Because Jesus didn’t have all of his followers with him from the beginning (they aren’t mentioned at the wedding in Cana), we don’t know precisely how much of that time Judas spent with him at the beginning.

  • He, like Peter, Matthew, and the other disciples, would have had to abandon his family and his job in order to accomplish this.
  • He didn’t come from a well-known or well-respected community (John 1:46).
  • In the end, Judas “gave up everything” (Matthew 19:27) in order to follow Jesus, despite the fact that he had no compelling reason to believe that his sacrifice would be fruitful.
  • Furthermore, Judas did this despite several warnings, which made the situation much more terrible.
  • While speaking at a huge gathering where many followers departed because they could not understand or support Jesus’ teaching, he informed the audience that one of them was “a demon” (John 6:70).
  • It’s difficult to determine whether or not Judas could have changed his mind at that point and whether or not anything else would have occurred to bring about Jesus’ execution.
  • Still, Judas was informed about the repercussions of his actions in a public setting.
  • Judas was given several opportunity to reconsider his conduct, yet he decided to betray Jesus regardless of the consequences.
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How Can We Learn from His Mistakes?

Beingtrayal of someone who turns out to be the Messiah is a horrible thing to do, as everyone understands. The fact that Judas actually had to do as one of Jesus’ disciples and the circumstances surrounding his betrayal are not generally considered, and they are variables that contributed to his catastrophic betrayal. When it came to following Jesus, Judas would have given up a lot of things. Researchers believe that Jesus spent around three years in ministry before his death. We don’t know precisely how much time Judas spent with him because he didn’t have all of his followers with him from the beginning (they aren’t mentioned at the wedding in Cana).

  • For this, he would have had to leave his family and his job, just like Peter, Matthew, and the other disciples.
  • He came from a little town that was not well-known or respected (John 1:46).
  • In the end, Judas “gave up everything” (Matthew 19:27) in order to follow Jesus, despite the fact that he had no compelling reason to believe that his sacrifice would be worthwhile.
  • Furthermore, Judas did this despite several warnings, which made it all the more terrible.
  • While speaking at a huge event where many followers departed because they could not understand or support Jesus’ teachings, he informed the audience that one of them was “a demon” (John 6:70).
  • It’s impossible to say if Judas may have changed his mind at that point and something else would have occurred to bring about Jesus’ execution.
  • Still, Judas was informed of the repercussions of his actions in a public forum.

During a later appearance in the Garden of Gethsemane, Jesus appears to push Judas into reconsidering what he is about to do (Luke 22:48). The betrayer of Jesus had several opportunity to reconsider his conduct, yet he opted to go ahead and do it anyhow.

Wednesday of Holy Week: Judas Betrays Jesus

On the third day of Holy Week, we remember the tragic narrative of Judas Iscariot, who was an Apostle of Christ. According to St. Matthew’s Gospel, “one of the twelve, named Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priests and asked them, ‘How much are you prepared to give me in exchange for giving him to you?'” (Matthew 26:52). They awarded him thirty pieces of silver to use as a reward. And from that point on, he actively sought for opportunities to betray him.” What is it about this incident that the Church remembers?

For this reason, we should implore our Heavenly Father to protect us from such treasonous rejection and defeat, not only because of the negative consequences they would have on us personally—which would be serious enough—but also because we could cause the loss of others who require the assistance of our good example, encouragement, and friendship.

  • They claim that it depicts Judas’ kiss with his betrayer.
  • Tell him that we all want to be true to him and that we do not want to sell him for thirty pennies, which is what our faults amount to: pride, envy, impurity, wrath, and resentment.
  • We must feel the weight of the Church and the weight of all of humanity on our shoulders.
  • We can make a difference right where we are, doing our jobs, caring for our families, and helping our friends.
  • As St.
  • Please pray Our Lord to protect us from more betrayals and to show us how to resist the temptations given by the devil, who wants to lead us astray with his grace.
  • So that the shameful narrative of Judas does not replicate itself in our lives, we must act now.

Our Lord, like the father in the story of the prodigal son, is waiting for us there, eager to welcome us and offer to us the kindness that he has shown us.

It’s never a bad moment to renew your relationship with God!

We must not consider to ourselves, “What can I, a pile of misery, do now?” God’s kindness is far greater!

God’s ability to elevate us from our abysses is very amazing!

How different the reactions were to the Master’s two betrayals—one delivering him into the hands of his persecutors, and the other rejecting Him three times—but how similar their actions were!

Peter repented, grieving for his guilt and pleading with Christ for forgiveness, and Christ confirmed his trust and love for him.

Judas, on the other hand, was unable to place his faith in Christ’s kindness.

When he delivered his first encyclical, Pope John Paul II talked of Christ’s “right to meet each and every one of us at that crucial time of our spiritual lives, the moment of conversion and forgiveness” (Redemptor Hominis, 20).

We must not deprive God the Father of the delight of receiving us back into his presence!

Let us implore Mary, the Hope of Christians, to keep us from becoming disheartened by our mistakes and sins, especially when they are repeated.

Let us urge her to get from her Son the grace of conversion, the effective desire to go to Confession, humble and contrite, to accept the Sacrament of divine mercy, and to start anew, and over, and over again, as many times as it is necessary for her to do so.

Why Did Judas Betray Jesus after Following Him for Three Years?

However, although hundreds of individuals accompanied Jesus during his career, occasionally giving housing or providing for basic necessities such as food (Luke 8), the majority of us are aware that Jesus had 12 disciples whom he specifically picked. The twelve apostles of Jesus would be comprised of individuals like these. Of these, Judas Iscariot is the most infamous. After three years of following Jesus during the course of Jesus’ public ministry, Judas Iscariot handed his companion over to the religious leaders, who tried him and sentenced him to death.

We may recall close pals from our high school or college years who have remained with us for more than three years if we reflect back on our past experiences.

I certainly hope not.

The reasons why Judas betrayed Jesus will be discussed in this article, as will the reasons why Judas finally took his own life when he learned the consequences of his conduct.

What Does the Bible Say about Judas?

However, although hundreds of people accompanied Jesus during his career, sometimes giving housing or providing for basic requirements such as food (Luke 8), most of us are aware that Jesus chose just 12 disciples to accompany him. The 12 apostles of Jesus would be comprised of individuals like these. Of these, Judas Iscariot is the most infamous. After three years of following Jesus during the course of Jesus’ public ministry, Judas Iscariot handed his companion over to the religious leaders, who tried and finally executed him.

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We may recall good pals from our high school or college years who have remained with us for more than three years if we focus back on our past experience.

I would want to think that’s not the case!

Some of the reasons why Judas betrayed Jesus will be discussed in this article, along with the reasons why Judas finally committed himself after realizing the consequences of his actions.

Why Did Judas Betray Jesus?

Although scores of individuals accompanied Jesus throughout his career, occasionally providing housing or caring for basic necessities such as food (Luke 8), most of us are aware that Jesus had 12 disciples whom he specifically chose. The twelve apostles of Jesus would be comprised of these individuals. Of these, Judas Iscariot is the most infamous. After three years of following Jesus during the course of Jesus’ public ministry, Judas Iscariot handed his companion over to the religious leaders to be tried and, finally, killed.

After all, when we reflect on our high school or college years, we may recall good friends who were with us for more than three years.

I would like to think that is not the case.

In this essay, we’ll look at some of the reasons why Judas betrayed Jesus, as well as why Judas finally committed himself after realizing the consequences of his actions.

How Did Judas Die?

Despite the fact that scores of individuals accompanied Jesus during his career, sometimes providing housing or caring for basic necessities such as food (Luke 8), most of us are aware that Jesus had 12 disciples whom he specifically chose. The twelve apostles of Jesus would be made up of people like these. The most prominent of these individuals was Judas Iscariot, who, after three years of following Jesus throughout Jesus’ public ministry, gave his buddy over to the religious leaders to be tried and, finally, executed.

After all, if we go back to our high school or college years, we may recall close friends who were with us for more than three years.

I would hope not.

In this essay, we’ll look at some of the reasons why Judas betrayed Jesus, as well as why Judas finally took his own life after realizing the consequences of his actions.

Why did Judas betray Jesus?

However, although hundreds of individuals accompanied Jesus during his career, occasionally giving housing or providing for basic necessities such as food (Luke 8), the majority of us are aware that Jesus had 12 disciples whom he specifically picked. The twelve apostles of Jesus would be comprised of individuals like these. Of these, Judas Iscariot is the most infamous. After three years of following Jesus during the course of Jesus’ public ministry, Judas Iscariot handed his companion over to the religious leaders, who tried him and sentenced him to death.

We may recall close pals from our high school or college years who have remained with us for more than three years if we reflect back on our past experiences.

I certainly hope not.

The reasons why Judas betrayed Jesus will be discussed in this article, as will the reasons why Judas finally took his own life when he learned the consequences of his conduct.

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Judas Iscariot: The Mysterious Disciple Who Betrayed Jesus with a Kiss

A monument at Rome’s Lateran Palace shows Judas betraying Jesus with a kiss, and the statue is known as the Kiss of Judas. (Photo courtesy of Noyan Yalcin/Shutterstock.com) Known as the betrayer of Jesus, Judas Iscariot was a follower of Jesus who betrayed him in return for a sum of money. William Klassen said in his book “Judas: Betrayer or Friend of Jesus?” that, among the 12 followers of Jesus, “only Peter receives more lines of coverage from the Gospel writers than does Judas” (Fortress Press, 1996).

Although he is well-known in the Bible, little is known about Judas.

The author Susan Gubar, who retired as a professor of English at Indiana University, wrote in her book “Judas” that “no one has succeeded in locating any sources of Judas independent of retellings of the New Testament narratives,” which is why “reputable thinkers” can continue to disbelieve in his historical reality (W.W.

Biblical Stories

The Gospels of Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John, as well as the Acts of the Apostles, all contain accounts of Judas’ betrayal of Jesus (also called the “Book of Acts”). The biblical accounts do not specify where or when Judas was born, and they give several distinct accounts of how he passed away. According to legend, Judas was a follower of Jesus who betrayed him by consenting to hand him up to a mob commanded by the chief priests in return for money — 30 pieces of silver, according to the Gospel of Matthew — in exchange for the death of his master.

The crowd then took Jesus to Pontius Pilate, the Roman ruler of Judea, where he was arraigned.

A 1,200-year-old manuscript written in Coptic — an Egyptian language that employs the Greek alphabet — and newly translated alleges that Judas used a kiss to betray his commander because Jesus had the capacity to change his appearance.

While the four gospels make no attempt to explain why a kiss was used to identify Jesus, they do make some observations.

As recorded in the Gospel of John, Jesus approached Judas during the final supper, warning him, “Whatever you are going to do, do it now.” Several times in the Gospels of Luke and John, Satan is said to have “entered” Judas at different points in his life, which may have affected his choice to betray Jesus.

According to the story, Judas was the treasurer for Jesus and his 12 disciples, responsible for transporting the money bag that the group shared and occasionally stealing from it.

I could have made a year’s salary off of that.’ He didn’t say this because he cared for the poor; rather, he said it because he was a robber who used to help himself to whatever was put into the money bag while he was in charge of it.” John 12:4-6 is an example of a parable.

Death of Judas

The Bible has two separate narratives of Judas’ death, each with its own explanation. According to the Gospel of Matthew, Judas was remorseful for betraying Jesus and attempted to return the 30 pieces of silver that he had been compensated with. In Matthew 27:3-5, Judas informs the chief priests and elders that he has betrayed them “‘I have sinned,’ he confessed, ‘for I have betrayed the blood of innocent people.’ ‘What does that mean to us?’ they inquired. You are solely responsible for this.

Then he walked out and committed himself by hanging himself.” In turn, the 30 pieces of silver were put to use to purchase a parcel of land that would eventually be utilized as a burial cemetery for foreigners – a location known as the Field of Blood.

“After receiving money for his wickedness, Judas went out and purchased a field, where he fell headfirst, causing his body to break open and all of his intestines to stream out.

Everyone in Jerusalem had heard about it, and as a result, the area became known as Akeldama, which means “Field of Blood” in their language.” Acts 1:18-19 is a biblical passage. According to the Acts of the Apostles, a man called Matthias took Judas’ position as one of the twelve disciples.

Gospel of Judas

National Geographic released the “Gospel of Judas” in 2006, a late third-century document that may portray Judas in a more favorable light than previously thought. The work is classified as a “apocryphal” document, meaning it was never included in the Bible, according to academics. Apocryphal literature about Jesus and his life were written all across the ancient world, and many of them are still in existence today. The Gospel of Judas, like certain other ancient manuscripts, is written in the Coptic language.

According to the translation, Jesus begged Judas to betray him in order for his execution to take place on the cross.

It is conceivable for you to get there, but you will suffer greatly as a result of your efforts.

April DeConick, chair of the department of religion at Rice University in Houston, wrote on her website that the Gospel of Judas is actually a “parody about a ‘demon’ Judas written by a particular group of Gnostic Christians we call the Sethians,” and that there are a number of errors in the translation.

Additional materials are available at:

  • Learn about the history of Ancient Israel, as well as who Jesus was and what he did. Learn about the World’s Earliest Christian Engraving in this article.

Owen Jarus is a writer for Live Science who specializes in archaeology and all topics relating to the history of mankind. A bachelor of arts degree from the University of Toronto and a journalism degree from Ryerson University are among Owen’s qualifications. He loves learning about fresh research and is always on the lookout for an interesting historical story.

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