What Can Jesus Do

What Would Jesus Really Do? Here are 10 Examples of What We are Called to Imitate

Because of the time lapse that occurs on Holy Saturday, the hope expressed in Psalm 139 is now anchored in Jesus’ personal experience: “If I make my bed in Sheol, you will be there!” (Psalm 139:8; 139:9) Jesus was crucified and died. He assimilated all of the darkness into himself. Death snatched Jesus as soon as he stepped into it. But then, in a stunning reversal of fortune, Jesus triumphed over death. Christ’s ascension illuminated the darkness with the brightness of his presence. For those who put their faith in him, he was able to permanently banish their darkness.

Just as Jesus took our sins onto himself, he has taken on himself all of our lonely deaths.

We take our time to allow the gap to be just that: a gap.

We recited the Psalms together, knowing that Jesus prayed them, and thinking that they served as a script for what Jesus would go through.

We chant Psalm 30, Jonah 2, and Psalm 143 in the voice of Jesus, so that we might pray during the awful wait of the first Holy Saturday.

Our happiness on Easter is heightened as a result of this.

Worship God alone

It’s normal for the heart to fall in love with what it considers worthwhile; sentiments will inevitably follow. “You shall worship the Lord your God, and Him alone must you serve,” Jesus cautions. (Matthew 4:10; Luke 4:10)

Preach the message of repentance

Everything that the heart holds dear is cherished, and affections will naturally follow what is seen as important. “You shall worship the Lord your God, and Him alone must you serve,” Jesus cautions. 4:10, according to Matthew 4:10.

Make disciples

The continual effort to educate and encourage is an important part of discipleship, aside from the evangelistic component of it. It is plainly stated in the Bible that discipleship involves “training them to obey all things that I have ordered you.” (Matthew 28:20; Mark 12:20). It is critical to expose individuals to a degree of biblical teaching that actually fosters sanctification and spiritual progress over the course of their entire lives.

Help the poor

What you are doing is actually pretty simple: when you love and serve the poor, you are also loving and serving Christ (Matthew 25:35).

“.He who has two tunics, let him give to him who has none; and he who has food, let him do likewise.” This is how Jesus taught us to share from the abundance of our blessings. (See Luke 3:11 for more information.)

Pray

Really, it’s rather simple: when you love and serve the poor, you are also loving and serving the Lord (Matthew 25:35). “.He who has two tunics, let him give to him who has none; and he who has food, let him do likewise.” This is how Jesus taught us to share from the abundance of our blessing. (See Luke 3:11 for further information.)

Be careful what you sow

It appears throughout the gospels, particularly in the Sermon on the Mount; for example, the kingdom of Heaven belongs to those who are poor in spirit; those who are meek will inherit the earth; those who hunger and thirst for righteousness will be satisfied; and those who are merciful will receive mercy. “Do not be misled; God is not mocked; for whatever a man sows, that he will also reap,” Paul the Apostle writes in Galatians 6:7-8. Indeed, “he who sows to his body will harvest corruption,” but “he who sows to the Spirit will reap eternal life,” according to the Bible.

Not worry

God provides for the sparrow, and He dresses the lilies in a beauty that surpasses that of even Solomon in all his splendor – God is good. How much more does your heavenly Father want the best for you and your family? As the rest of the verse in Matthew 6:31-34 explains, “Therefore, do not be concerned about what to eat and drink or what to dress, for these things are not up to you.” Because your heavenly Father understands that you require all of these things. Rather, seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all of these things will be added to you.

Love His enemies

Do kind to those who hate you, Jesus says (Luke 6:27); pray for those who persecute you, Jesus says (Matthew 5:44); and bless those who curse you, Jesus adds (Luke 6:27-36). “If you love people who love you, what reward do you have?” says the author. What makes you think that even the tax collectors don’t do the same?” (See Matthew 5:46.)

Adhere to the Golden Rule

As Jesus says in Luke 6:27, do good to those who hate you; pray for those who persecute you; and bless those who curse you (Matthew 5:44), we should do good to those who hate us (Luke 6:27-36). “For what reward do you have if you love those who love you? What makes you think that even tax collectors don’t perform the same thing? Christ’s teachings on forgiveness are found in Matthew 5:46.

Honor Father and Mother

We are taught by Jesus to honor and respect our mothers and fathers, no matter how much they have merited it. With the first commandment comes the promise that “everything will be well with you and that you will live a long time on the world.” (See also Ephesians 6:3).

What Did Jesus Do?

In every way, the table serves as his altar. Jesus Seminar co-founder John Dominic Crossan makes a compelling argument that Jesus’ table manners were possibly the most radical feature of his life—that Jesus’ table manners opened the way to his heavenly morals—in the book, The Jesus Seminar. Crossan sees Jesus as a member of a Mediterranean Jewish peasant society, a culture defined by clan and cohort, in which who eats with whom determines who stands where and for what reasons. As a result, the manner Jesus continually breaks the standards of “commensality” when it comes to eating would have surprised his contemporaries.

In his most famous quote, which is still surprising to even the most religious Jew or Muslim, he says, “What goes into a man’s mouth does not make him dirty; it is what comes out of his mouth that causes him to be unclean.” Jesus isn’t a hedonist or an epicurean, but he’s also not an ascetic, as seen by the fact that he feeds the crowds rather than advising them on how to live without food.

  1. The other element of Jesus’ message, a harsh and even vindictive prophesy of a final judgment and a large-scale damnation, might appear to be at odds with the laid-back egalitarianism of the wide road and the open table to a modern reader.
  2. If the end is close, why are so many wise words being spoken?
  3. The idea that a later, maybe “unpersonified,” corpus of Hellenized wisdom literature was placed onto an older story of a Jewish messianic prophet has been put up by certain scholars.
  4. But among charismatic prophets, it is typical to see a single figure who “projects” two personae at the same time, or in close succession, each one gloomy and one dreamy, and this is a regular occurrence.

African-American community leaders prior to the civil-rights movement, for example, were called upon to serve as both prophets and political agitators to an oppressed and persecuted people in a manner not unlike from that of the historical Jesus (and all the other forgotten zealots and rabbis whom the first-century Jewish historian Josephus names and sighs over).

  • Malcolm X was the prototypical contemporary apocalyptic prophet-politician, plainly advocating murder and a religion of millennial vengeance, all fueled by a set of cult beliefs—a hovering U.F.O., a bizarre racial myth—that fueled his whole political career and career of his followers.
  • His martyrdom earned him the moniker “prophet of hatred,” and within three decades of his death—roughly the time span that separates the Gospels from Jesus—he could find himself on the cover of a liberal humanist magazine such as this one.
  • (As if to demonstrate this point, just this week came news of chapters from Haley’s “Autobiography” that had been withheld because they “showed too much of my father’s humanity,” according to Malcolm’s daughter.
  • Although there is a genuine and immutable difference between what may be termed narrative facts and statement-making truths—between what makes believable, if broad, sense in a story and what is necessary for a close-knit philosophical argument—the distinction is not insignificant.

While the concept that the ring of power should be delivered to two undersized amateurs to toss into a volcano in the very heart of the enemy’s camp makes solid and sober sense in Tolkien, it would be surprising if such a premise were used as the basis for the Middle Earth Military Academy’s curriculum.

  1. In Mark, Jesus’ divinity develops without ever needing to be explained intellectually, and it does so without ever needing to be explained.
  2. This is a narrative of self-discovery: he doesn’t know who he is at first, and then he begins to believe that he knows, and then he begins to question, and in anguish and glory, he dies and is recognized.
  3. However, as a statement under consideration, it imposes unbearable requirements on logic.
  4. As a result, we get the Jesus depicted in the Book of John, unlike others who don’t.
  5. A lamb whose throat has not been slit and which has not bled is not much of an offering, to put it mildly.
  6. However, this is ruled out by the entire force of the Jewish concept of deity, which is omnipresent and omniscient, capable of knowing and seeing everything.
  7. You’ll find that the more you think about it, the more amazing, or bizarre, it gets.
  8. To some extent, therefore, the lengthy history of early Church councils that attempted to transform fairy tales into theology is a history of people walking out of a movie puzzled and looking for someone else to explain what just happened.
  9. What was at stake in the seemingly absurd wars over the Arian heresy—the question of whether Jesus the Son shared an essence with God the Father or merely a substance—that consumed the Western world during the second and third centuries is explained by Jenkins.

In the same way that Sean Connery and Daniel Craig are two different faces of the same role, or in the same way that James Bond and Ian Fleming are two different authors of the same creation, was Jesus one with God in the same way that Sean Connery and Daniel Craig are two different authors of the same creation?

  1. Individuals debated in this manner because they were members of social organizations such as cities, schools, clans, and networks, in which words are displayed on flags and pennants: who promised to whom was inextricably bound up with who said what in what language.
  2. There has long been an effort to separate inspiration from intolerance, beautiful Jesus from ugly Jesus, and this has been going on for centuries.
  3. The intelligent Jesus is a brother of the shrewd Christ, and the two are related.
  4. Pullman, a writer of tremendous skill and passion, as seen in his wonderful children’s fantasies, considers the betrayal of Jesus by his brother Christ to be a fundamental betrayal of mankind on the part of the Christ.
  5. Pullman’s book, on the other hand, is not solely polemical; he also retells the parables and acts in a lucid simplicity that removes the Pauline barnacles from his characters.
  6. You’re interested in knowing who they are, right?
  7. All of the research, however, seems to agree on one thing: Paul’s heavenly Christ appeared first, while Jesus the wise teacher appeared later.
  8. Its intractability contributes to the intoxicating effect of believing.
  9. The two continue to speak, and the fact that they are two is what differentiates the religion and provides it with its discursive dynamism.
  10. W.
  11. Auden, the best-known Christian poet of the twentieth century, and William Empson, the greatest anti-Christian polemicist of the same century, were precise contemporaries, close friends, and virtually completely interchangeable Englishmen in their roles as slovenly social types.

Empson emerged as the most outspoken critic of a morality reduced to “keeping the taboos imposed by an infinite malignity” during the same period, beginning in the fatal nineteen-forties, in which the reintroduction of human sacrifice as a sacred principle left the believer with “no sense either of personal honour or of the public good.” The difference here is that where Auden saw a good Christ, Empson saw a terrible Christ.) That wail may still be heard above and beyond the words.

The most important thing is still the passion.

Despite the fact that he is leading a rebellion against Rome that is not really a rebellion, it does not really leave any room for retreat, Jesus appears to have an inkling of the situation in which he finds himself, and some part of his soul does not want to be a part of it: “Abba, Father, everything is possible for you.

  1. When the victim was undressed, it was done so in order to rob him of dignity.
  2. (As an example of how brutal it was, Josephus writes that he begged the Roman rulers to remove three of his friends from the cross after they had spent hours on it; only one of them survived.) The victim’s legs were broken, causing him to pass away in a blaze of agony.
  3. It was terrible, and it was always there.
  4. His imagination conjures a man being nailed to a cross, shouts of pain, two partner crosses in view, and suddenly we crane out to see two hundred crosses and two hundred victims: we are at the beginning of the tale, the execution of Jewish rebels in 4 B.C., and not the end of the story.

However, Jesus’ cry of desolation—”My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”—which was later evangelists either edited out or explained away as an apropos quotation from the Psalm—pierces us even now, thousands of years after it was written in the Gospel of Mark, across all the centuries and Church comforts.

  • At the very least, the scream reminds us that the Jesus faith begins with a lack of trust on our own.
  • Despite Jesus’ announcement that “some of those who are standing here will not experience death until they see the kingdom of God,” none of those there did.
  • It wasn’t, and the entire rest of the story is based around apologizing for what went horribly wrong.
  • It all starts with the first words of faith, when the sublime symbolic turn (or the retreat to metaphor, if you prefer) takes place.
  • The reality is represented by the argument, and the absence of certainty represents the certainty.
  • The word was there from the beginning, and it was there in the middle, and it was right there at the end, Word without beginning or end, Amen.
  • Rather than being a representation of liberal debate, as some more open-minded theologians would have us believe, it is a mystery in a story that is only opened in the same way that the tomb is opened, with a mystery left inside that will never be completely explained or explored.

Someone appears to have expressed an interest in this at some point. *Correction, August 13, 2010: Not all of the Gospels are named after disciples, as was originally stated.

What Does Jesus Do?

I’d want to direct your attention to two wonderful remarks made by John the Baptist. The most striking thing that has occurred to me as I have focused on these passages is that there truly isn’t a clearer explanation of what Jesus Christ accomplishes, and what He is capable of doing for all of us now, than this.

  • To attract your attention to two wonderful lines from the book of John, I’d like to share them with you. After giving these lines some thought, I realized that there truly isn’t a better explanation of what Jesus Christ accomplishes and what He is able to do for all of us now than what is included within them.
See also:  How Do I Follow Jesus

Both of Christ’s major works—his death on the cross to take away sin and his baptism in the Holy Spirit—stand at the heart of Christian life and experience. So, for today, I’d like us to concentrate on these two truths, which tell us what Christ accomplishes for anybody who would accept Him as their Savior.

1.) Christ Takes Away Sin

In the words of Jesus, “Behold the Lamb of God who wipes away the sin of the world!” (See also John 1:29) Keep in mind that John was in the wilderness, and that a large number of people were flocking to him. “You are going to meet God, and you had better get ready to meet Him,” he said in his speech to the congregation. People came to confess their sins and to be baptized, showing that they were in need of being cleansed from their misdeeds. “Behold, the Lamb of God!” exclaims John as he sees Jesus approaching him on the road.

i. The Lamb is a substitute.

It was Abraham who went and grabbed the ram and offered it in sacrifice in place of his own son. (Genesis 22:13; cf. Genesis 22:12) The astonishing tale of how God tested Abraham may be found in the book of Genesis: “Take your son, your only son Isaac, whom you love, and travel to the country of Moriah, and give him there as a burnt offering” (Genesis 22:2). When Abraham and Isaac get on the mountain, Isaac remarks, “We have the fire and the wood, but where is the lamb for a burned offering?” (Genesis 22:7).

  1. “God will provide for himself a lamb,” Abraham declares confidently (Genesis 22:8).
  2. In Isaac’s absence, the ram served as a replacement.
  3. If you think about it, what type of God would ask Abraham to accomplish anything like that?
  4. We can see from this passage that God offered His own Son, whom He loved, as the sacrifice.
  5. Christ, who was with God and is God, is the Lamb of God who was supplied by God as a substitute whose life was given in the place of the people of God.

ii. The Lamb is a sacrifice.

A portion of the blood will be applied on the two doorposts and lintel of each of the residences. In addition, if I see any blood, I will simply walk right by you. (1 Kings 12:7, 13) (Exodus 12:7, 13) After that, we come to the tale of the Passover, when God’s judgment swept across Egypt, where God’s people had been slaves for hundreds of years. People who believed in God killed a lamb and painted the blood of the lamb on the doorposts and lintels of their homes, and God responded by saying, “When I see the blood, I will pass over you.” The lamb’s life was sacrificed, and the lamb’s blood was spilt as a result.

Continue the tale forward, and in the New Testament, the apostle John proclaims, “Behold, the Lamb of God. Jesus is the substitutionary atonement who will take your place. In his place, blood will be shed on your behalf, and he is the sacrifice.

iii. The Lamb is the sin-bearer.

They are to take some of the blood and apply it to the two doorposts and the lintel of each home. And if I see any blood, I’ll just walk right by it. (1 Kings 12:7, 13) Exodus 12:7, 13 We now come to the account of the Passover, when God’s wrath swept across Egypt, where God’s people had been slaves for hundreds of years. People who believed in God killed a lamb and painted the blood of the lamb on the doorposts and lintels of their homes, and God responded by saying, “When I see your blood, I will pass over you.” There has been a sacrifice of a lamb’s life, as well as the shed of its blood.

In his place, blood will be poured on your behalf, and he is the ultimate sacrifice.

2.) Christ Gives the Holy Spirit

A portion of the blood will be applied on the two doorposts and lintel of the dwellings. And as soon as I see the blood, I shall pass you by. (Exodus 12:7, 13; cf. v. 6) We now come to the tale of the Passover, during which God’s wrath swept across Egypt, where God’s people had been slaves. God’s people killed a lamb and painted the blood of the lamb on the doorposts and lintels of their homes, and God replied, “When I see the blood, I will pass over you.” The lamb’s life was sacrificed, and the lamb’s blood was shed.

In his place, blood will be shed on your behalf, and he is the offering.

The Ministry of Jesus

Taking away sins and baptizing with the Holy Spirit are the two main functions of Jesus’ ministry, and He never performs one function without the other. He removes sin from the world and continues to do so. He is completely immersed in the Holy Spirit and continues to pour Him forth. Consequently, in Jesus, there is forgiveness for the mistakes of the past and strength to face the problems of the present and future. Don’t be satisfied with external manifestations of faith! “I have come to accomplish for you what no religion in the world can do, and what no other person in the world can do,” Jesus Christ declares to you today.

Ready to join the ranks of people who have said, “I will follow Christ?” I’ll accompany him on his walk.

You will come to realize that life is actually possible.

This article was adapted from Pastor Colin’s sermon, “ Knowing Who Jesus Is,” from his sermonMeet Jesus, Part 1.

Bracelets, caps, and other youth items are decorated with this catchphrase. However, for the majority of people, it is merely a fad, a gimmick, or a fashion statement. Only a small number of people appear to be interested in learning the solution to the query. What do you think Jesus would do, and what do you think we should do in response? This is a question that millions of people are asking. However, the majority of individuals become completely perplexed when it comes to this crucial subject!

  • Young people all around the United States are sporting “WWJD” caps, wristbands, and other memorabilia to show their support.
  • However, for the majority of people, it is simply a trend, an item of apparel, or a funny gimmick.
  • Ah, the glory days of youth.
  • Fergus Ferguson, a 14-year-old with blue eyes who was hanging out at a local pool club in Dallas, explained why she wore it: ‘It complements my swimming suit.” WWJD wristbands are no longer reserved for Sunday school children.
  • It’s really fantastic.” While running for president in the previous election, Al Gore stated that he frequently questioned himself, “What would Jesus do?” Going after the “religious vote,” both Al Gore and George W.
  • If people truly want to know what Jesus would do, where can they go to get the most definitive, authorized answer?
  • The solution is straightforward.

Because if you believe that the Bible is genuinely the inspired Word of God, you can very well predict what Jesus would do in the vast majority of circumstances if He were still alive and well on our planet today!

While in the human body, this inspired passage reveals that Jesus would perform what He has already done!

John 10:30 quotes Jesus as saying, “I and My Father are one.” And in Malachi 3:6, God informs us, “I am the Lord, and I am not a man who changes!” “Heaven and earth will pass away, but My words will by no means fade away,” Jesus himself reminds us once more (Matthew 24:35).

teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you” (Matthew 28:19-20).

How simple can it possibly be?

Not only did He want His faithful servants to go forth and teach the same message, but He also wanted them to teach the same way of life —”all things” —to “all the nations,” not just the Jews!

What about professing Christianity throughout the previous 2,000 years? Isn’t it what they’ve been up to? In no manner, shape, or form!

“Another” Jesus Now Presented

Currently, few people are aware that a “different” Jesus Christ and a “different” style of life have been taught to the world by professors who have mistakenly claimed to be acting in His name! “For if he who comes teaches another Jesus, whom we have not preached, or if you get a different spirit, which you have not received, or a different gospel, which you have not embraced, you may easily put up with it,” the Apostle Paul cautioned the Christians of His day (2 Corinthians 11:4). For decades, professing Christians have been spreading the gospel of “another Jesus” – a message that is diametrically opposed to the one Jesus preached!

  • In that case, ‘heresy’ would have meant a departure from His method, his teaching, his spirit, and his kingdom; it does not mean that presently “In Rufus M.
  • But what exactly is wrong with Jesus’ own teaching and “His” style of life—the complete way of life that Jesus and the original Apostles taught and lived—that no one else seems to see?
  • Several biblical beliefs and practices were altered with the hope of making it “easier” for the Gentile world to become “Christian,” as they perceived it.
  • True Christianity has nothing to do with this “Christianity”!
  • 45).
  • Hurlbut expresses regret once more, saying: “The magnificence of the services of worship rose, but they were less spiritual and heartfelt than those held in previous eras.
  • Some of the old pagan feasts were transformed into church festivals, with a change in name as well as in place of worship.
  • 79).
  • What, however, was the outcome?
  • 79).

So, what was the actual Jesus like, according to the Bible? What was His true teaching—his “style of life” and his example—and how did He convey it?

Jesus’ Actual Example

A “different” Jesus Christ and a “different” way of life have been taught to the world by professors who were mistakenly claiming to be acting in His name. “For if he who comes teaches a different Jesus from the one we have preached, or if you get a different spirit from the one you have received, or a different gospel from the one you have accepted, you may easily put up with it,” the Apostle Paul admonished the Christians of His day (2 Corinthians 11:4). Professing Christians have been propagating “another Jesus” and a message that is diametrically opposed to that which Jesus preached for decades.

  • In that case, ‘heresy’ would have meant a departure from His method, his teaching, his spirit, and his kingdom.
  • Jones’s The Church’s Debt to Heretics, pp.
  • ) As for Jesus’ own teaching and “His” method—that is, the complete way of life that Jesus and the original Apostles taught and lived—what is it that is wrong with this picture?
  • Several biblical doctrines and practices were altered with the hope of making it “easier” for the Gentile world to adopt “Christian” beliefs and practices.

True Christianity had absolutely nothing to do with “Christianity.” In the words of another well-known source, “as long as the church was mostly Jewish, the Hebrew Sabbath was observed; nevertheless, as the church grew increasingly Gentile, the first day progressively took the place of the seventh day” (The Story of the Christian Church, Jesse Lyman Hurlbut, p.

  • What was the end result of all of these modifications?
  • The practices and rituals of paganism gradually made their way into Christian worship practices and celebrations.
  • Around the year 405 AD, pictures of saints and martyrs began to emerge in churches, initially as monuments, and then gradually becoming objects of reverence, adoration, and devotion ” (p.
  • “The world” was welcomed into the early Catholic church by the bishops of the time period.
  • “As a result of the church being in power, we do not witness Christianity converting the world to its own ideal, but rather the church controlling the world,” Hurlbut explains.
  • 79).

Was Jesus the Christ of the Bible a real person? His true teaching—his “way of life” and his example—was what we should be looking for today.

The Biblical Holy Days

A “different” Jesus Christ and a “different” way of life have been taught to the world by professors who are mistakenly claiming to be doing it in His name. “For if he who comes teaches another Jesus whom we have not preached, or if you get a different spirit which you have not received, or a different gospel which you have not embraced, you may easily put up with it,” the Apostle Paul admonished the Christians of His day (2 Corinthians 11:4). For generations, professing Christians have been propagating “another Jesus” and a message that is diametrically opposed to the one that Jesus preached!

  • In that case, ‘heresy’ would have meant a departure from His method, his teaching, his spirit, and his kingdom.
  • Jones’s The Church’s Debt to Heretics, pp.
  • It was “too Jewish” for the early Roman Catholic bishops and monks to accept, so they rejected it outright.
  • Several biblical beliefs and practices were altered with the hope of making it “easier” for the Gentile world to become “Christian.” What these misled theologians seems to have failed to comprehend was that their modified and watered-down version of the Bible was in fact the original.
  • As another well-known source acknowledges: “As long as the church was mostly Jewish, the Hebrew Sabbath was observed; nevertheless, as the church grew increasingly Gentile, the first day eventually took the place of the seventh day” (The Story of the Christian Church, Jesse Lyman Hurlbut, p.
  • What was the outcome of all of these changes?
  • Eventually, the forms and practices of paganism found their way into the church service.
  • Around the year 405 AD, pictures of saints and martyrs began to emerge in churches, initially as monuments, and then gradually becoming objects of reverence, adoration, and devotion ” (p.
  • The early Catholic bishops were successful in bringing “the world” into their church.
  • “As a result of the church being in power, we do not see Christianity converting the world to its own ideal, but rather the church dominating the world,” Hurlbut explains (p.
  • It should be evident to you, dear reader, that “another Jesus” has begun to be offered to the world—a Jesus who is drastically “different” from the Jesus of the New Testament!

So, how did the Jesus of the Bible appear in real life? In reality, what was His true teaching—his “style of life” and his example—was it?

Jesus’ Example, Day by Day

What was Jesus’ life like throughout the year, day by day, as God manifested in the flesh, providing us with the ultimate example? Every sincere biblical scholar understands that, while in the flesh, Jesus was completely submissive to the Father’s will. “I have obeyed the commands of My Father,” Jesus said (John 15:10). Jesus further declared, clearly referring to the Ten Commandments, “Whoever then breaches even one of the smallest of these commandments, and teaches others to do so, shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven; but whoever does and teaches them, he shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5:19).

  • Jesus prayed and communed with His Father on a consistent basis.
  • According to Mark’s Gospel, “Now in the morning, having risen early and gone out to a secluded location, He prayed” (Mark 1:35-36).
  • Throughout the day, Jesus was loving, serving, healing, and instructing His fellow man in the ways of God (Matthew 4:23).
  • He was considerate and patient with me.
  • Jesus was known as a “giver.” “It is more fortunate to give than it is to receive,” he stated (Acts 20:35).
  • Instead, He “emptied” Himself of the heavenly splendor He had shared with the Father in order to serve and subsequently die for all of mankind, a sacrifice that is unprecedented in history (Philippians 2:5-8).
  • “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” the second great commandment, was illustrated by Jesus throughout His life (Matthew 22:39).
  • Because the Apostle John was prompted to share the following information with us: “Because it is through God’s love that we are able to obey His commandments.
  • The Ten Commandments serve as a “channel” or “riverbed” for God’s love to flow down!
  • Many psychologists, sociologists, and “authorities” today, on the other hand, are attempting to develop numerous human “value systems” or standards of behavior, despite the fact that our Creator already accomplished this —thousands of years ago!
  • There are many “religious” persons, particularly theologians, who devote a great deal of their time and attention to finding reasons to argue that God’s spiritual Law does not have to be followed.
See also:  Why Is It Jesus H Christ

If Jesus were to reincarnate as a human being, he would approach every circumstance with two everlasting principles in mind: “How can I love God with all of my heart, soul, and mind?” and “How can I love my neighbor as myself?” How can I exhibit love to my neighbor in the same way that I would like people to offer love to me?

  1. Jesus would make every effort to assist, support, and inspire everyone in His immediate vicinity to reach their full human potential.
  2. As He did with the religious authorities of His day, He would reprimand individuals harshly if they displayed rebellious or self-righteous attitudes if it was absolutely necessary (Matthew 23:15).
  3. (Hebrews 12:6).
  4. “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever,” we should remember (Hebrews 13:8).
  5. When faced with a problem, he would respond with entire, out-pouring care for his fellow man as well as with profound love, devotion, adoration, and obedience toward the Almighty God the Father.
  6. God’s spiritual Law will be propagated across the entire world from Zion, which will be Christ’s earthly headquarters at that time (Isaiah 2:2-3).
  7. 4).
  8. We will send you a free copy of our important pamphlet, Restoring Apostolic Christianity.
  9. The only need is that you are willing to follow His instructions: “Studyto present thyself acceptable unto God, a workman who needeth not to be ashamed,rightly dividing the word of truth” (2 Timothy 2:15,KJV).

Hopefully, God will provide you with the enthusiasm and confidence to do so—and to follow in the footsteps of the Biblical Jesus Christ!

What does Jesus do for Me?

Read Romans 5:1-11 to have a better understanding. Jesus saves and gives to those who believe. Christ has saved us:Jesus is our Savior! Because not everyone has been rescued, Christ’s atonement does not apply to everyone; this is referred to as “Limited Atonement” (not meaning that His work and sacrifice was not sufficient). if it were available to everyone, then there would be universal salvation, which means that everyone, regardless of their religious or philosophical beliefs, would be saved (John 6:35-57; 10:15-18; 27-29; 11:51-52; Eph.

1:20; 1 John 4:9-10; Rev.1:4-6; 5:9-10; 22:17).

Christ alters us in the following ways: Due to the fact that it is the mechanism by which those who place their faith in Jesus Christ are transported from the world of sin and death into the realm of the Spirit and life, the Gospel is the ongoing operation of divine power!

Christ has redeemed us: Those of us who have been justified by faith now enjoy peace with God.

God’s unfailing love for us was demonstrated to us when He reconciled us to Himself by the sacrifice of his Son, even when we were still worthless sinners and His “enemy” (as the Bible puts it).

Christ makes atonement for our sins: Atonement literally means “covering”; Christ covered us with His righteousness so that God would not be able to see our sin and would not be contaminated by our presence.

Christ forgives us of our sins: Christ does not hold our sins against us any longer.

Christ has paid our debt, and as a result, we are right with God.

As a result, salvation is not based on logic or knowledge (2 Cor.

It is not a matter of optimism or wishful thinking, but rather the reality of God’s love.

Christ’s redemption washed away our sins and enabled us to remain in faith for the glory of God.

Our trust is in Christ and His character—not in our own self-worth, but in “Christ-esteem” instead!

One man, Adam, brought sin into the world, and it spread to all people; the grace of God, which justifies us, came into the world through one man, God, and it spread to all people.

As a result, it is unjust to God, not to us!

As a result of His love and grace, Jesus Christ is able to transcend the boundaries of our sin and grant us His Grace.

It provides us with the joy we need to face the challenges of life.

He accomplishes this via the power of His Spirit and love!

It is God’s unfailing love that keeps us firmly linked in grace and committed to His greater glory in our lives.

God has always treated people with grace, beginning with Adam and continuing through the Patriarchs, prophets, and everyone in between.

We are all descendants of Adam; we had no say in our first birth, but we had to learn from it (John 16:33).

As a result of our sin, He takes us in and reconciles us, making us no longer His enemies but rather His friends again (John 14-15).

As a result, you have gained God’s approval.

We have actual riches in the implications of justification, which is our access to God through the Holy Spirit as a result of what Christ has done.

The love that emanates from us comes not from ourselves, but from God, who sends His Spirit to guide us (1 Cor.

We cannot demonstrate love; all we can do is respond to it and obey it.

4:4), and as a result, we must place our faith in God and His timing rather than our own.

We have love, hope, joy, and grace at our disposal.

We have access to God at any moment.

The fact that our sins are covered and removed from His sight gives us confidence and hope; yet, it is only by faith that we may accept and enjoy these blessings.

This understanding contributes to our sense of well-being!

They genuinely aid in the advancement of one’s spiritual life!

God does not always remove them from our lives; rather, He takes us through them and utilizes them to help us mature and develop our personalities.

Trials are not a personal assault on us, but rather an opportunity for God to work in us in a more profound way so that we might be of greater service to Him in the lives of others.

Are you aware of everything that Jesus has done for you?

Christ’s redemption consists in the fact that He has taken away our sins and has saved us in faith for the glory of God!

What kind of life do you want to lead?

As Christians, we must keep our attention on the cause (Christ) rather than the consequence (what He has done), since the effect will come from a natural desire, resulting in development and maturity.

We dedicate ourselves to Christ: Our identity is based only on who we are in Christ, and nothing else.

We shall be able to distinguish between Christ’s interests in others and our own interests in ourselves (John 15:3; Rom.

9:22).

We offer our service to Christ in the following ways: True service consists in doing things for others that we do not particularly enjoy doing ourselves (2 Cor.

Our service should not be dictated by our own desires or requirements.

When God tells us to be salt and light, all we do is separate ourselves into a sub-culture, which is counterproductive.

We need to keep our eyes on Him and our minds on Him at all times!

It is necessary for us to put Jesus first (John 15:12; 21:17; 2 Peter 1:5-7; 3:9; 3 John 7) and allow Him to work in our lives.

Love is also disciplined, consistent, and spontaneous in its manifestations.

Christ will come to our aid when we are at our most desperate need.

As Abraham demonstrated by faith, justification is not an escape from the bad things that happen in our lives; rather, it is a starting point for building and developing character, patience, and dependence on God’s grace.

Our response to our Lord and His love, shown through passion and obedience, is what it is all about: this is what Discipleship is all about.

We must recognize the joy (James 1:2-4), as well as the hope (Heb.

This is fundamental to the pursuit of life and liberty.

We would give up and get captivated by correction or oppressed into drudgery if we did not have hope.

As we progress through life, we learn; and, when we learn, we grow; and, as we grow, we build character, as well as refine and deepen our devotion to Jesus Christ.

Our actual riches are our character and the work He is doing in our lives through us.

We must understand who we are in Christ if we are to take this hope to new heights and apply it with passion and conviction.

This hope will not only fuel our liberty, but it will also fuel our worship, as we give thanks to God for all that He has done. Consider what Jesus Christ has done for you. Do you understand what he has done for you? Questions:

  1. Romans 5:1-11 should be read. Saves and gives to those who believe in him. Our Savior, Jesus Christ, has saved us. Because not everyone is saved, Christ’s redemption does not apply to everyone
  2. This is referred to as “Limited Atonement” in Christian theology (not meaning that His work and sacrifice was not sufficient). In the event that it were available to everyone, there would be universal salvation – meaning that all people, regardless of their faith or beliefs, would be saved (John 6:35-57
  3. 10:15-18
  4. 27-29
  5. 11:51-52
  6. Eph. 1:3-14
  7. Gal.2:20
  8. 3:13-14
  9. 4:4
  10. 5:1
  11. 1 Pet. 1:20
  12. 1 John 4:9-10
  13. Rev.1:4-6
  14. 5:9-10
  15. 22:17). Despite the fact that Christ’s Godhood and power were not limited in any way, His redemption was intended solely for those whom He had predestined to be used by God for His purposes. As a result of Christ’s transformation, we become: Due to the fact that it is the means by which all who place their faith in Jesus Christ are transferred from the realm of sin and death to the realm of the Spirit and life, the Gospel is the continual operation of divine power. The most important and fundamental aspect of our lives is that we have been saved and redeemed, and we received it at the exact moment we realized we needed it. As a result of Christ’s redemption, those of us who are justified by faith can now enjoy peace with God. Because of what He has done for us and the promise of a future Heaven, we are encouraged to rejoice and magnify God even in the midst of trials. God’s unfailing love for us was demonstrated to us when He reconciled us to Himself through the death of his Son, even while we were still unworthy sinners and His “enemies” (as the Bible describes them). The created order has been restored in the righteousness of Christ (John 10:15), and we have been transformed into a completely new creation as a result of His sacrifice (Solus Christus, “by Christ alone”). Jesus Christ provides atonement for our sins: It is said that Christ covered us with His righteousness so that God would not be able to see our sin and would not become contaminated by us. Previously, atonement was accomplished through animal sacrifice, which covered sins but did not remove them from the record, as Christ does for us. We no longer have to worry about our sins because Christ has taken them on himself. Consequently, we are right with God because of Christ rather than because of our faith and obedience. Christ has paid our debt, and as a result, we are no longer in debt. It is the fruit and proof of our faith and obedience. Consequently, salvation is not based on logic or knowledge, but rather on faith (2 Cor. 5:17-19). Instead of optimism or wishful thinking, God’s love is demonstrated in reality. We have a relationship with God because of Jesus. As a result of Christ’s redemption, our sins have been forgiven and we have been preserved in faith for the glory of the Father. Assurance from Christ: God assures us of our salvation and motivates us to rejoice and magnify Him no matter what happens or what we go through because He has been through more than we have. “Christ-esteem” is our source of confidence
  16. It is not “self-esteem” that we place our trust in. Fairness is a hallmark of Christ: This passage from Romans (5:1-21) responds to the common argument that sin is unjust. All people were affected by sin because it was introduced into the world by one man, Adam
  17. The grace of God, which justifies us, was introduced into the world by one man/God. We all deserved to die
  18. Adam did not. However, Jesus did not deserve to die. As a result, it is unfair to God rather than to us! Our sin earned us death by the law
  19. However, we are offered the superior, abounding love of grace, which is described as “reigning through righteousness to eternal life by Jesus Christ.” Gratitude is extended to us by Christ. Rather than being a last-minute addition to God’s plan, grace was an integral part of it from the start. As a result of His love and grace, Jesus Christ transcends the boundaries of our sin and grants us the gift of His Grace. We are saved, yes, but this grace accomplishes a great deal more. To endure the harshness of life with joy is a reward. In him, we find the strength to endure, and he gives our lives a sense of meaning and purpose. The Spirit of God and the love of God enable Him to do this! He opens the door to Himself for us to walk through. Our attachment to God in grace and purpose for His glory is sustained by His unfailing love. We would quickly fall back into our sin and forget who we are in Christ if we were left to our own devices, just as the Israelites did throughout the Old Testament, particularly in Judges 2. Everyone, from Adam to Abraham to the Patriarchs to prophets and everyone else, has always been treated with grace by the Almighty. The Old Testament provides us with a better understanding of the conflict and limitation of the Law of Moses. We are all descendants of Adam
  20. We had no say in our first birth, but we had to learn from it nonetheless (John 16:33). He is the glue that holds us together and helps us to grow closer to God. As a result of our sin, He takes us in and reconciles us, making us no longer His enemies but rather His friends in the process (John 14-15). As a result of Christ’s righteousness, we are free. When God justifies you, it means that He has not only forgiven and accepted you, but He has also clothed you with the righteousness of Christ. Because of this, you have earned God’s respect. The assurance of Hell is temporary
  21. However, the blessings of justification are permanent. We have true riches in the implications of justification, which is our access to God through the Holy Spirit as a result of what Christ has accomplished. Christ’s death in our place represents an aspect of His Love. Love that flows from us is not our own, but is instead a gift from God, who sends it through His Spirit (1 Cor. 13). The only way we can demonstrate love is to respond to it and follow its dictates. God’s time was used throughout (John 17:1
  22. Acts 2:23
  23. Gal. 4:4), and as a result, we must place our reliance in God and His timing rather than in our own. Among the riches Christ bestows upon us are No amount of money can purchase what we have in abundance, such as how lovely it is to be a Christian. We have love, hope, joy, and grace at our disposal. When we have access to God at any moment, we are not bound to what we have done
  24. If riches were dependent on our efforts, they would be restricted to what we have done
  25. And we can accomplish nothing to please God on our own, leaving us with nothing of everlasting worth. The peace that Christ brings is as follows: Peace signifies that we have been reconciled with God and are no longer His adversaries, as we were while we were in sin. The fact that our sins are covered and removed from His sight gives us confidence and hope
  26. Nonetheless, it is only by faith that we may accept and receive God’s forgiveness. To an all-knowing, all-powerful God, our conception of fairness cannot be a concern. This understanding contributes to our overall happiness! As we face difficult circumstances, Christ provides the following: (Rom. 8:28) Trials, rather of working against us, work for our benefit. Indeed, they aid in the advancement of spiritual development! Our trials and tribulations are referred to as tribulations. Often, God does not remove things from our lives
  27. Rather, He carries us through them and utilizes them to help us mature and develop character. Tough times strengthen our faith and character, enabling us to be more effective in serving the Lord. Instead of being a personal assault on us, trials allow God to operate in us in a more profound way, enabling us to be of greater service to Him and others. Gratitude is the gift that we give to Jesus. Does it dawn on you just how much Jesus has sacrificed for you? We have a relationship with God because of Jesus. Jesus Christ’s redemption is characterized by the fact that He wiped away our sins while also keeping us in faith for the glory of God! How will you proceed from here is the question. What sort of life do you want to lead? As a result, we express our repentance to Christ in the following manner: Although repentance is necessary for salvation, it is not sufficient in and of itself. Focusing on the source (Christ) rather than the consequence (what He has done) is essential because the impact will arise from a natural desire and result in development and maturity. Our responsibility is to care for the chicken, not the eggs, because the eggs will arrive as a result of our efforts to care for the poultry. In Christ, we surrender ourselves: Our identity is based only on who we are in Christ. When we truly comprehend that the love of Christ has been poured out in us, we are able to identify with Him and identify with ourselves. We shall be able to distinguish between Christ’s interests in others and our own interests in ourselves. (John 15:3
  28. Rom. 9:3
  29. 1 Cor. 9:22). Christ provides us with the ability to be free from frustration and stress (1 John 4:17-19). We dedicate ourselves to Christ’s ministry by doing the following things: Service is defined as performing tasks for others that we do not particularly enjoy doing (2 Cor. 12:15). Neither our desires nor our needs should direct our service. God has no use for those who believe they are “all that,” (holy). When God invites us to be salt and light, all we do is separate ourselves into a sub-culture. Not serving, but becoming His children is our ultimate purpose, and our commitment to Him will drive us to serve others. To do this, we must keep our gaze fixed on Him and our thoughts focused on Him! It is not in our nature to be loving, yet we give Christ our love nevertheless. As a result, we must put Jesus first (John 15:12
  30. 21:17
  31. 2 Peter 1:5-7
  32. 3:9
  33. 3 John 7) and allow Him to do His work in us. As a result, God will place us in situations and with people we don’t really like for in order for us to learn true love and forgiveness. Aside from being disciplined and steady, love is also impulsive and unpredictable. As a result of our greatest difficulty being addressed and the barrier that was between us and God being removed, we are no longer separated from God. We offer Christ our growth. Even in our greatest need, Christ will be there for us. A commitment to maturing in Christ is something we can make. As Abraham demonstrated by faith, justification is not an escape from the awful things that happen in our lives
  34. Rather, it is a beginning point for building and developing character, patience, and reliance on God’s mercy. Every decision we make carries with it a level of responsibility. Our response to our Lord and His love, shown through passion and obedience, is what it is all about: this is what discipleship is all about. Our eyes must be opened to the magnificence of what Christ has accomplished for us. Heb. 6:18-19) We must recognize the joy (James 1:2-4), as well as the hope (James 1:2-4). There can be no life or liberty without this. We cannot successfully endure in life if we do not have hope, since we would give up and become enslaved by correction or forced into drudgery if we did not have hope. It is in this hope that we may find the path that will lead us to maturity and spiritual development. As we progress through life, we learn
  35. And, as we learn, we grow
  36. And, as we grow, we build character, as well as refine and deepen our devotion to Jesus Christ. Developing our personalities in this way enables us to be more effective in the lives of others. What we truly value is who we are as individuals and what God is doing in our lives. And, in comparison to the rest of the world, this wealth is far more tangible and stunning. We must understand who we are in Him before we can take this hope to new heights and apply it with passion and conviction. Taking care to ensure that our faith is derived from God’s nature rather than from ours is essential! It is not only our liberty that will be fueled by this optimism, but it will also fire our worship as we give thanks to God for all He has done. Consider what Jesus Christ has done in your life. Do you understand what he has done for you? Questions:
  1. Has it occurred to you that the implications of our justification are our genuine wealth, rather than what we produce or earn or achieve
  1. What does it mean to be a magnificent Christian who is brimming with love, hope, joy, and grace?
  1. The question is, how can “our riches” be converted into becoming a magnificent Christian who is full to overflowing point with love, hope, joy, and grace?
  1. In your opinion, what does it mean that you now have certainty and hope and that your sin and shame have been washed away? However, it must be accepted and received by whoever and in what capacity.
  1. What exactly is the function of repentance? The question is, how can you keep repentance on your mind and in the forefront of your Christian journey?
  1. What is it that you must do in order to allow your goal for development and maturity in your life to be realized?
  1. How can you demonstrate to people that faith and obedience are the fruits and evidence of the Christian life, rather than the instigators of it
  1. What is it about life that you find frustrating? What exactly do you need to do to get rid of your frustrations? What can Jesus do to assist you
  1. The foundation of our faith is in Christ and His character, not in ourselves. So, how can you put this “Christ-esteem” into practice?
  1. “True service is doing for others what we would rather not do for ourselves.” So, what activities do you despise doing?
  1. Do you know what you can do to reinforce that your identity is based only on your relationship with Christ?
  1. When was the last time Christ came to you in your time of greatest need
  1. The Christian faith’s primary objective or “prime directive” (to use a Star Trek term) is to achieve salvation.
  1. What are some of the ways that challenges may help you grow spiritually? Lots of Christians believe that only those who are sinful or have little faith suffer the consequences of their actions, and that if you have enough faith, you will be blessed. Is this something from the Bible? If yes, what is the reason behind this? If not, what is the reason behind this?
  1. The answer of love is to place Jesus at the forefront of our thoughts and actions. So, how are you going to go about it?
  1. If God delivers you people and events that you do not like, how can you learn to be better and have greater character by accepting and learning from them?
  1. How do you conduct your life in such a way that it shows that you have been restored in the righteousness of Christ, as a completely new creation?
  1. Taking care to ensure that our faith is derived from God’s nature rather than from ours is essential. So, how are you going to go about it?

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