People Who Have Seen Jesus

How should a Christian respond to people who claim, ‘I saw Jesus’?

Have you ever heard someone claim that they had a vision of Jesus? Maybe it happened in a dream or a “vision,” or maybe it happened when they were praying on a mountainside, hoping God would send them a sign? Were they able to see Jesus in person? Are they telling the truth? Is it possible that they are completely deluded? What should we do in response to people who claim to have seen the Lord Jesus Christ?

Is Jesus on earth today?

The Bible is unequivocal in its assertion that Jesus is not physically present on earth now. When Jesus’ earthly mission came to a close, the events surrounding His death, burial, and resurrection were observed by hundreds of witnesses. When Jesus was raised to the right hand of the Father in Heaven (Acts 1:9-11), he established his permanent residence at the right hand of the Father. In the days before that, Jesus made it obvious to His followers that He would no longer be present on the earth.

When He was praying with them, He said: “I am leaving the world, but they are still in the world, and I am coming to you.” He was praying with them at the time.

Jesus, on the other hand, did not abandon us; he sent us the Holy Spirit, who is able to indwell Christians and assist them (John 16:7-15).

The Bible makes no mention of Jesus coming to the world, either physically or spiritually, before the allotted time has come.

Visions of Jesus in the Bible

Clearly, according to the Bible, Jesus is not physically present on earth at this time. His death, burial, and resurrection were all observed by hundreds of people at the conclusion of His earthly mission, marking the culmination of His earthly ministry. When Jesus was raised to the right hand of the Father in Heaven (Acts 1:9-11), he established His permanent residence at the right hand of the Father. In the days before that, Jesus made it obvious to His apostles that He would no longer be present on the planet.

“I will no longer be in the world, but they will continue to be in the world, and I will come to you,” He added as He prayed with them.

Despite this, Jesus did not abandon us; he sent us the Holy Spirit, who indwells Christians and aids them in their endeavors (John 16:7-15).

The Bible makes no mention of Jesus coming to the world, either physically or spiritually, before the appointed time has come and gone. Because Jesus has ascended to live with the Father in Heaven, we must be cautious of anybody who claims to have seen Him in person in this lifetime.

Can Christians receive divine revelation today?

The majority of those who claim to have seen Jesus do so because they have received supernatural revelation from the Lord. The Bible mentions nothing about anybody receiving supernatural insights during this time period, which is especially true since that the apostolic age has ended. Anything that is considered a “addition” to the Bible’s canon is to be rejected. A new revelation cannot be added to the Bible since it is comprehensive, inerrant, and unchangeable (2 Timothy 3:16-17). We are warned in Revelation 22:18 that anybody who adds to or subtracts from the Bible will be punished.

If they did indeed see Jesus—and that is a huge if—then everything that they saw must have been in accordance with the Bible, according to the Bible.

False Visions: How Cults are Born

Throughout history, many people have claimed to have seen Jesus, but do you know what a lot of them have in common? They all claim to have seen him on the cross. Those who had received “visions” went off and formed a religious sect, saying that their “new” reading of the Bible was the “correct” one. I’m not exaggerating! Two “personages,” whom he described as Jesus and God the Father, appeared to Joseph Smith and instructed him to establish a new church, which he named the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormonism).

Following her claim that she had a vision that “confirmed” her personal opinion that theSabbathwas for all believers, her followers went on to create the Seventh Day Adventists, which was a cult spin-off of the failed cult!

This does not bode well for those who claim to have witnessed Jesus in person in the current day.

Seeing Jesus: God’s Choice

Many people have claimed to have seen Jesus throughout history, but do you know what a common thread runs through many of them? Those who had received “visions” went on to form a religious sect, saying that their “new” reading of the Bible was the “correct” one. You don’t believe me? Two “personages,” whom he described as Jesus and God the Father, appeared to Joseph Smith and instructed him to establish a new church, which he called the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormonism).

Following her claim that she had a vision that “confirmed” her personal opinion that theSabbathwas for all believers, her followers went on to create the Seventh Day Adventists, which was a cult offshoot of the previously failed cult!

Observe any patterns that seem to be reoccurring? Those who claim to have seen Jesus in person in the modern day are not looking well at the moment. They didn’t seem to be able to see Jesus as clearly as they claimed.

The Bible is the Final Word

When someone claims to have “seen Jesus” or “Jesus appeared in a vision and told me X,” we should evaluate their claims in light of the Bible’s teaching on the subject. Is their perspective in conflict with the Scriptures? What part of this “Jesus” promotes the concept that if people follow him, they would gain tremendous money and belongings is unclear. Is the vision a source of encouragement or justification for sin? If that’s the case, then this “Jesus” isn’t really Jesus at all. The Bible must be regarded as truth, and any vision or message that contradicts it must be discarded.

  • While talking about his personal contact with Jesus’ splendor on the Mount of Transfiguration, the apostle Peter did not place a strong emphasis on his own personal experience.
  • The Bible’s truth should always take precedence, visions/dreams should be used to support the inerrant Word of God, and any personal experiences should only serve to confirm the Bible’s teachings rather than to introduce new concepts.
  • A vision of Jesus is not necessary for us to believe or embrace Him as our Savior.
  • To be accepted by God, we must place our trust in His gift of grace alone.

ALSO SEE:

  • Who is Jesus
  • What was Jesus’ physical appearance like
  • Is it possible that our dreams come from God? Is it possible for God to communicate with us via dreams? To walk by faith rather than sight, what does that imply?
TL;DR

Because there is nothing in the Bible that indicates that Jesus would appear to people today in visions or dreams, we must be suspicious and careful when someone claims to have seen Jesus. Jesus informed His followers that He would be departing this earth and returning to the Father in the near future (John 17:11). Since the Bible is complete, there is no reason for any further revelations to be given (Revelation 22:18). The Bible indicates that many people claim to have seen Jesus; but, if the “Jesus” in a vision or dream says anything that contradicts Scripture and/or encourages wrongdoing, or offers financial benefit as payment, that message must be disregarded as false.

Writer: Vivian Bricker

In her spare time, Vivian enjoys reading, studying the Bible, and assisting others in their spiritual journeys. She is committed to assisting others in their quest to learn more about Jesus and is willing to provide a hand in any manner she can.

Her favorite activities include spending time with her family and friends, cooking, painting, and being outside in the fresh air and sunshine. When she is not writing, you can find her outside enjoying the sunlight or embarking on an adventure with her family.

‘I’ve Seen Jesus’: This Guy Made Three Trips to Heaven, and the People He Saw There Will Astound You

Landon Whitley was eight years old when he climbed into the backseat of his parents’ Pontiac and embarked on the first of three journeys to the afterlife. It all started on a Sunday morning in 1997 when Julie Kemp, her husband Andy, and their little son Landon were traveling home from church when an ambulance returning to its station collided with their vehicle in a crosswalk. Andy died instantaneously. Rescuers were able to stabilize Julie, but they were first unaware that there was a third passenger in the vehicle.

  • “And when they discovered Landon’s sneaker, it necessitated a more extensive search for his corpse.
  • And they all got to work on him immediately away in order to bring him back to life.” Landon was resuscitated and sent to Carolina’s Medical Center in critical condition.
  • The doctors didn’t offer Julie much hope that he would make it.
  • Because of all of the brain damage, he would be unable to walk, communicate, or eat properly “Julie expresses herself in this way: “I was in such a state of desperation that anything was acceptable.
  • He was the only thing I had.” During her husband’s burial, Julie recalls feeling as though God had abandoned her.
  • And, when I’m sitting at the funeral, I’m yelling at God to do something.
  • I’m perplexed as to why He didn’t send angels to defend us instead.

According to Julie, “He’s hooked up to a whole bunch of devices to keep him alive.” “There are no indications of this.

They don’t notice anything occurring.

To everyone’s surprise, he exhibited no signs of brain injury.

Julie recalls, “I remember when.” “His face was covered with scars.

And I didn’t want to put him through any more pain.

I asked him where he was and he said, “Yes, I know where he is.” ‘I saw him in the afterlife.'” Despite the passage of time since the disaster, Landon has vivid memories of his incredible encounters in Heaven.

And it was amusing because I recall us all seeming like we were standing in a square.

‘I saw your other two children,’ I said.

However, I suffered two miscarriages before to the birth of Landon.

We had never mentioned anything to Landon before.

Just by being in Heaven, I suppose you know who everyone is—either you know your own or you know who everyone else is.” BELOW: Watch Julie and Landon’s testimony from The 700 Club.

He claims that he encountered Jesus on the third occasion and was given a mission.

In a vision, Jesus told me that I needed to return to earth and live as a good Christian, in addition to telling others about Him.” Landon and Julie are now sharing their experience with others who are grieving and in need of encouragement through the nonprofit organization GriefShare.

However, I am aware that there were angels present.

As opposed to being trapped in my grief or remaining enraged at God, I was able to utilize my experience to encourage others not to give up and to maintain their faith during their grieving journey.” Landon expresses himself like follows: “People need to understand that Jesus is real, that there is a heaven, and that there are angels.

And to abide by His commandments and the Bible, and life does improve in the long run.” According to Julie’s book, Faith Has Its Reasons, God has used their experience to lead others to Him, as well as bringing fresh benefits into their own lives as a result of the process.

He is always eager to share his belief in the existence of a heaven with others.

He’s there because he’s been there.” “I’m aware that I’m doing it for Jesus,” Landon adds. “I know that He’s real. I am aware that angels are present. I know that there’s a heaven. I’ve had a vision of Jesus. I’m certain He’s present. This is what I’m doing since he’s asked me to do it for him.”

How should a Christian respond to people who claim, “I saw Jesus”?

QuestionAnswer During His earthly career, Jesus frequently had big crowds following Him wherever He went, and there were a significant number of people who saw and heard Jesus, as well as many who were cured by Him and had conversations with Him. After His resurrection, Jesus was seen by His followers, Mary Magdalene, and around five hundred other individuals, including the apostles (1 Corinthians 15:6). Jesus, on the other hand, has been sitting at the right hand of the Father since His ascension.

  • Stephen (Acts 7:55–56) and John (Revelation 1:12–16) are two examples of persons who have been allowed glimpses of Jesus in His splendor.
  • Although Paul reported seeing a dazzling light and hearing Jesus’ voice during this experience, the Bible does not mention that he really encountered Jesus in the flesh at the time.
  • During His High Priestly Prayer, which is recounted in the Gospel of John 17, Jesus prays for protection for His disciples because He will “no longer be in the earth” (John 17:11).
  • John 14:17 and 15:26 state that instead of sending the Spirit to indwell people, He will be seated in heaven with the Father (John 14:17).
  • Now that the apostolic period has come to an end, the Bible makes no mention of any such extra-biblical revelations that would be expected to occur today.
  • For this reason alone, when someone claims to have “seen Jesus,” a Christian should be wary of believing them.
  • Some individuals who have claimed to have “seen Jesus” have gone on to mislead a large number of others.
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Ellen G.

It goes without saying that not everyone who claims to have seen Jesus is on the side of reality.

These kind of stories are particularly frequent in “closed” countries, which are those in which access to the Bible and the gospel is severely restricted or nonexistent.

According to Isaiah 59:1, “the arm of the LORD is not too short to rescue,” and the methods God employs to propagate the gospel are entirely up to Him.

Any time the “Jesus” who comes to someone varies in any way from the Jesus described in the Bible, it is necessary to reject the vision on the grounds that it is fake.

If the person getting the vision is aggrandized, or if the vision is a source of pride or financial gain for the one receiving the vision, then the vision should be rejected.

In 2 Peter 1:16–18, Peter recounts his own personal experience on the Mount of Transfiguration, when he had witnessed the majesty of Christ for the first time in person.

It is necessary to place Scripture first and to place miracles, dreams, and visions in a secondary position.

We have the written Word to rely on.

We have the Comforter at our disposal. We have the privilege of trusting in Christ despite the fact that we have never seen Him (John 20:29). Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top of page) What should a Christian say in response to someone who claims to have “seen Jesus”?

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QuestionAnswer As He traveled across the world during His earthly ministry, Jesus was frequently followed by huge groups of people, and a significant number of people were able to witness and hear Jesus, as well as be cured by and speak with him. Aside from His followers and Mary Magdalene, Jesus was seen by more than five hundred additional individuals after His resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:6). Jesus, on the other hand, has been sitting at the right side of the Father ever since His ascension into heaven.

  1. On the way to Damascus, Paul came face to face with the Lord Jesus (Acts 9:1-29).
  2. Following His death and resurrection, Jesus told His disciples that He would no longer be present in the earth.
  3. Him and His disciples were both aware that His time on earth was drawing to a close and that He would no longer be physically present with them.
  4. If someone were to see Jesus today, it would have to be through a divine vision or some other form of heavenly revelation.
  5. This is the final volume in the Bible’s canon (see Revelation 22:18).
  6. Nothing in a person’s vision of Jesus today would contradict the reality of the Bible, nor would it add anything to the revelation God has already given us via His Word, if such a person were to have such a vision today.
  7. The Seventh-Day Adventist movement was founded in 1844 when Ellen G.

Not everyone who claims to have seen Jesus is, of course, on the side of righteousness.

These kind of stories are particularly prevalent in “closed” countries, which are those in which access to the Bible and the gospel is severely restricted or prohibited.

According to Isaiah 59:1, “the LORD’s arm is not too short to rescue,” and the techniques by which God disseminates the gospel are entirely up to Him.

Anyone who has seen a vision of “Jesus” who varies in any manner from the Jesus who is depicted in the Bible should consider the vision to be fraudulent.

This type of vision should not be accepted if the person receiving it is aggrandized, or if the vision is a source of pride or financial gain.

According to 2 Peter 1:16–18, Peter recounts his own personal experience on the Mount of Transfiguration, where he had witnessed the majesty of Christ up close and personal.

It is necessary to place Scripture first before miracles, dreams, and visions.

In the written Word, we have God’s will for us. Comforter is in our possession. Because we have not seen Christ, we have the privilege of trusting in His promises (John 20:29). to:Jesus Christ: Do You Have Any Questions? If someone claims to have seen Jesus, how should a Christian respond?

Woman Claims to Have Seen Jesus in Heaven

QuestionAnswer During His earthly career, Jesus frequently had big crowds following Him wherever He went, and there were a significant number of individuals who witnessed and heard Jesus, as well as many who were cured by Him and talked with Him. Jesus was seen by His disciples, Mary Magdalene, and around five hundred other individuals after His resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:6). Jesus, on the other hand, has been sitting at the right hand of the Father ever since His ascension. When someone claim to have had a heavenly vision or declare, “I saw Jesus,” we should answer with a healthy dose of skepticism, not outright denial.

  • On the journey to Damascus, Paul had an encounter with the Lord Jesus (Acts 9:1–19).
  • After His death and resurrection, Jesus assured His disciples that He would no longer be present in the earth.
  • He was well aware that His time on this planet was drawing to a close and that He would no longer be physically present with His disciples.
  • If someone were to see Jesus today, it would have to be through a supernatural vision or a heavenly revelation of some form.
  • The Bible’s canon has been completed (see Revelation 22:18).
  • Nothing in a person’s vision of Jesus today would contradict the reality of the Bible, nor would it add anything to the revelation God has already given us via His Word, if such a person were to have such a vision.
  • For example, in 1820, Joseph Smith claimed to have seen Jesus, which resulted in the establishment of the Mormon religion.

White claimed to have seen Jesus.

Former Muslims have told accounts of meeting Jesus in a dream, which led them to abandon Islam and place their trust in Christ.

It is important to use caution when considering any claim of divinely given dreams, and while it is improbable that all such dreams are genuine visits from Jesus, we might consider the possibility that God is using dreams to bring individuals to trust in Christ.

It’s important to approach the claim “I saw Jesus” with a fair dose of skepticism and caution.

It is necessary to dismiss the vision if the “Jesus” who appears delivers instructions that might lead someone to sin.

If the vision of Jesus leads to a decrease in trust on the written Word of God and an increase in reliance on human experience, then the vision is not from God.

“We have the prophetic wordmade more certain, to which you would do well to pay heed,” Peter writes, rather than relying on personal experience as a basis for faith (2 Peter 1:19, NASB).

We walk by faith, not by sight, as we go through life (2 Corinthians 5:7).

We have the written Word on our side. We’ve got the Comforter. We have the privilege of trusting in Christ even if we have never seen Him (John 20:29). Questions regarding Jesus Christ (return to top) What should a Christian say in response to persons who claim to have “seen Jesus”?

Colton Burpo

QuestionAnswer During His earthly mission, Jesus frequently had big crowds following Him wherever He went, and there were a significant number of individuals who saw and heard Jesus, were cured by Him, and spoke with Him. Following His resurrection, Jesus was seen by His disciples, Mary Magdalene, and around five hundred other people (1 Corinthians 15:6). Since His ascension, however, Jesus has taken up residence at the right hand of the Father. When someone claim to have had a heavenly vision or proclaim, “I saw Jesus,” we should reply with a healthy dose of skepticism.

  1. Paul came face to face with the Lord Jesus on the way to Damascus (Acts 9:1–19).
  2. Following His death and resurrection, Jesus assured His followers that He would no longer be present in the earth.
  3. He was well aware that His time on earth was drawing to a close and that He would no longer be physically present with His people.
  4. If someone today were to genuinely see Jesus, it would take some sort of supernatural vision or heavenly revelation on their own.
  5. The canon of Scripture has been completed (see Revelation 22:18).
  6. Nothing in a person’s view of Jesus today would contradict the reality of the Bible, nor would it add anything to the revelation God has already given us via His Word.
  7. For example, in 1820, Joseph Smith claimed to have seen Jesus, and the outcome was the establishment of the Mormon religion.

White claimed to have seen Jesus.

Former Muslims have occasionally reported meeting Jesus in a dream, which led them to abandon Islam and place their trust in Christ.

While we should exercise caution when considering claims of divinely given dreams, and while it is improbable that all such dreams are genuine visits from Jesus, we might consider the possibility that God is using dreams to bring individuals to faith in Christ.

The assertion that “I saw Jesus” should be treated with a fair amount of skepticism and caution.

If the “Jesus” who appears delivers instructions that would cause anybody to sin, then the vision is fraudulent and must be rejected.

If the vision of Jesus leads to a decrease in trust on the written Word of God and an increase in reliance on human experience, the vision is not from God.

However, rather than relying on personal experience as a basis for faith, Peter directs his readers to the written Word of God: “We have the prophetic word made more certain, to which you would do well to pay heed” (2 Peter 1:19, NASB).

We walk by faith, not by sight (2 Corinthians 5:7).

We have the written Word. We have the Comforter on hand. We have the privilege of trusting in Christ despite never having seen Him (John 20:29). Questions concerning the deity of Jesus Christ What should a Christian say to persons who claim to have “seen Jesus”?

Crystal McVea

She was declared clinically dead for nine minutes in 2009 due to complications from pancreatitis. When Crystal awoke, she discovered that she was no longer on earth, but rather in paradise. McVea stated in an interview that she was greeted by two angels and that she sensed the presence of someone. She is convinced that God was standing right next to her the entire time. The sight and sensations I had were beyond words. They were breathtakingly gorgeous and brilliant.” It’s like a dazzling light!

God in Christ appeared to me, and I think I was in the presence of God the Father and the Holy Spirit.” “I recognized that I was in God’s presence in Christ, and I believe that I was in God the Father’s and the Holy Spirit’s presence.” Crystal McVea also stated that she was forced to choose between remaining in heaven or returning to earth and becoming a mother, and that she chose to remain in heaven rather than return to earth.

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However, when she arrived to the heavenly gates of heaven, God appeared to her as a small girl playing, which was God’s way of informing her that she was need to return to earth in order to raise a family again.

Don Piper

Don Piper was declared clinically dead for 90 minutes after being involved in a catastrophic accident in 2008, and according to an interview with Bill O’Reilly on Fox News, Don claimed that he had gone to heaven and was greeted by his family and friends outside the celestial gates following his death. He did not see Jesus or God, but he did spend time with members of his family who had not grown or changed with time. During the conversation, Piper claimed that he was on his way to the celestial gates when he suddenly woke up.

There were a number of factors that convinced him that what was going on at the time was real and legitimate.

Have you ever had a similar experience like this one before?

What It Means to See Jesus

In the trunk of a chestnut tree, a young man once claimed to have seen Jesus’ face, with the bark moving as if it were flesh, and he told me about it. An elderly woman informed me that Christ had appeared to her in the late afternoon sunlight that streamed through her hospital window during her hospitalization. A father who was dying of lung cancer confided that he had looked up at a crucifix in a church years ago and watched as the body hanging there writhed and wriggled, seemingly coming to life in front of his eyes; the experience had been so terrifying that he had never told anyone about it before; he was now dying of lung cancer.

Even secondhand accounts can suffice, which is why I found Robert Hudson’s “Seeing Jesus: Visionary Encounters from the First Century to the Present” to be so enjoyable.

Hudson’ Hudson’s book is arranged into two taxonomies: kinds of seers (disciples, ascetics, mystics, trailblazers, and moderns) and types of seeing (disciples, ascetics, mystics, trailblazers, and moderns) (appearances, apparitions, and visions).

It is less useful than the second taxonomy, which is derived from mystical research and provides a method of categorizing and arranging these types of occurrences.

Early witnesses, those who saw the risen Christ in the years immediately following his resurrection, are discussed in detail by Hudson, including the apostle Thomas, who touched his crucifixion wounds; the disciples who encountered him while traveling, first Cleopas on the road to Emmaus and then Paul on the road to Damascus; and John of Patmos, whose apocalyptic writings are included in the Book of Revelation.

These are all canonical accounts that are well-known to everyone who has even a passing familiarity with the New Testament.

Mystics are discussed in detail in the section on mystics, which is centered on four interesting personalities, the most well-known of whom being Francis of Assisi.

As an example, in his biography of Hildegard, Oliver Sacks describes the ecstatic, multisensory visions that she had of lights, stars, blazing fires, and human figures as “a shower of phosphenes in transit across the visual field, their passage being followed by a negative scotoma,” which means “a shower of phosphenes on their way.” She was suffering from migraines, to put it another way.

Many of these theories make use of pareidolia, which is the tendency to create meaning where there is none—often by seeing faces in inanimate things, such as a man in the moon—as their basis.

Perhaps the most renowned of these is a tortilla.

As well as uncovering facts that bring the distant past to life—for example, the highest-paid athlete in history is likely not Michael Jordan or Tiger Woods, but Gaius Appuleius Diocles, a Roman charioteer who lived in the first century AD.

Several of the most interesting chapters in “Seeing Jesus” are in-depth studies of single visionaries and close readings of the direct testimonies that they left behind, such as the four chapters devoted to his quartet of medieval mystics—or the chapter on John of Patmos, which is titled “Voom!” and begins with a lesson on hermeneutics based on “The Cat in the Hat.” Those chapters stand in contrast to others that are hurried, such as one that contains a cursory account of Sojourner Truth’s visions, padded by boilerplate biography and stock political commentary, and another that, like a spiritual clown car, jams the lives of Emanuel Swedenborg, Jacob Boehme, George Fox, Mother Ann Lee, Public Universal Friend, Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of vila, and John of the Cross into a “Seeing Jesus” is more of a devotional experience than an analytical one.

Hudson describes it as a “anecdotal history,” one that will “take each story of seeing Jesus at face value, neither believing nor disbelieving, and claiming no more for them than the person claimed for himself or herself.” Hudson describes it as “anecdotal history.” It will strike some secular readers as too credulous, and it will strike some devout readers as too incredulous, because it lacks the revelatory strangeness of something like ” Visions and Appearances of Jesus,” the philosopher Phillip H.

  • Wiebe’s clinical account of twenty-eight contemporary “encounter experiences,” which was published in the same year as the book.
  • His book “Seeing Jesus” is published by Broadleaf Books, an imprint owned by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and Hudson is the author of several other books.
  • Eerdmans, whose own independent Christian publishing company is still in operation.
  • Even though he admits to having a personal Christian faith, and confesses to yearning for a vision of Christ, he remains skeptical of all such visions.

The artist recalled a time when she was a young woman praying while looking at the trees in her back yard, only to have Christ’s face appear before her, blinding her to everything but his features, then hovering smaller and smaller in her field of vision for months after he’d first appeared, she said.

When it comes to the visionaries in his book, Hudson never outright endorses or debunks any of them, even when his own characterizations of them seem to demand it, as with his description of the extravagant life style and scurrilous fund-raising tactics of televangelist Oral Roberts, who Hudson describes as “a scurrilous fund-raiser.” Nonetheless, at its heart, “Seeing Jesus” possesses a theological conviction that may pique the interest of skeptics—while also assuaging the fears of the faithful, because it comes directly from Christ.

In his epilogue, Hudson writes that for centuries, “Christian thinkers—the majority of whom were not mystics—have told us that we see the face of Jesus every day, walking the streets of every city, and in the face of every person.” As Nicholas of Cusa wrote: “In all faces is seen the Face of faces, veiled and hidden in a riddle.” He uses this quote to illustrate his point.

Because, as Dietrich Bonhoeffer later explained, “he comes in the form of the beggar, of the dissolute human child in ragged clothes, asking for help,” they will be judged according to how they treated the least among their brethren.

While there are people on the earth, Christ will walk among them as your neighbor, as the one through whom God calls you, speaks to you, and makes demands on you.” When most Christians hear this, they interpret it to mean that if they were to see Jesus, he would not look like the man depicted in Warner Sallman’s famous painting or the seated figure depicted in Leonardo da Vinci’s “The Last Supper.” Rather than being supernatural or spectral, the visions of Jesus that Christians are explicitly instructed to seek are humble and human: we are instructed to look for Christ in the faces of one another.

In spite of the fact that Hudson isn’t sure what to make of all the visions in his book, he acknowledges that they are real, and he concludes “Seeing Jesus” with a story from the pandemic, in which he encounters a panhandler outside a café and is compelled to assist him, partly because he has been thinking so much about what it means to see Christ.

“‘How did you know it was him?’ says the skeptic in me.” This is what Hudson writes in the book’s final lines. “The mystic in me wonders, ‘How do you know it wasn’t?'” says the author.

5 people who say they’ve been to heaven

Alex Malarky claimed to have been to paradise. He didn’t do it. Malarky, who said he died and went to paradise following a bus crash when he was six years old, has since retracted his claim, according to NPR’s Bill Chappell, who first reported the story. Tyndale House, the publisher of the book he wrote about his experiences, also ordered the book to be taken off the stores. Afterwards, Malarky published a statement on Pulpit and Pen in which he acknowledged to lying and even claimed that he had never read the Bible.

  1. “I did not go to Heaven,” Malarky said in his letter.
  2. It was the first time I claimed to have read the Bible that I came under fire.
  3. They should simply read the Bible, which is plenty.
  4. Anything written by a human being cannot be considered infallible.” Malarky isn’t the only individual to claim that he was taken to heaven by God.
  5. And, while we can’t say for certain whether or not these individuals actually visited paradise, here are five individuals who claim to have witnessed heaven and survived to tell the tale.
  6. You may have already heard about Colton Burpo, who has one of the most popular stories of 2014 about reaching paradise, and who has one of the most popular stories of 2014.
  7. While there, he claims to have had a conversation with Jesus and learned about his sister, who died before he had the opportunity to meet her.

Crystal McVeaMcVea died for nine minutes in 2009 as a result of complications from pancreatitis, according to her family.

According to McVea in an interview with The Blaze, she was met by two angels on her arrival.

“All I saw and felt was this magnificent, dazzling, blazing light,” says the narrator.

“However, I was acutely aware that I was standing in the presence of the one and only God.

This, I believe, was due to “the presence of the father, as well as the presence of the son, and the presence of the Holy Spirit.” McVea said that God approached her and asked if she wanted to remain in heaven or return to Earth to be a mother.

However, as she got close to heaven’s gate, she claims God appeared to her as a small girl playing, which she believes was Heavenly Father’s way of telling her she needed to return to her home and raise her children.

According to an interview Don Piper made to Fox News pundit Bill O’Reilly in 2008, he was unconscious for 90 minutes following a head-on accident.

Instead of seeing God or Jesus, he spent time with his family members, who he said hadn’t changed throughout the years.

“This is a very exceptional and one-of-a-kind circumstance,” Piper said on O’Reilly’s show.

I ran across a number of folks I hadn’t expected to see.

This is a fleeting phase.

“I didn’t want to come back to this place,” I said.

Eben Alexander is a Harvard neurosurgeon who has always been dubious about the existence of God.

It is reported that Alexander was surrounded by butterflies and that a woman assured him that there was nothing to be afraid of while in paradise, according to The Huffington Post.

As Alexander said in an interview with HuffPost, “I eventually realized that the ecstasy of these animals, as they soared along, was such that they were compelled to produce this noise — that if the joy didn’t flow out of them in this way, they would just not be able to contain it.” Brian Miller is a writer who lives in the United States.

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He informed his wife that he had seen deceased family members and had traveled to the hereafter, according to an interview Miller made to Fox News on the subject of his near-death experience.

Then he came upon a walkway with flowers on either side, where he was met by a guy and a lady, he explained. The two individuals snatched him by the arms and informed him that he needed to return to earth immediately. Email:[email protected] Follow Herb Scribner on Twitter: @herbscribner

Have You Seen Jesus?

Being saved and having a personal encounter with Jesus are not the same thing. Many individuals, including those who have never seen Jesus, have received and are participating in God’s grace. After all, once you’ve seen Him, you’ll never be the same again. Other items will no longer hold the same allure as they had previously. Never lose sight of the distinction between what you see Jesus to be and what He has done on your behalf. If you perceive just what He has done for you, your God is not great enough.

  1. (Hebrews 11:27).
  2. Jesus appears to people for whom He has done anything, but we have no way of knowing when He will appear or how long it will take.
  3. Then you’ll be able to shout, “At last, I see Him!” (See also John 9:25.) You and your companion must view Jesus personally since no one else can see Jesus with your eyes.
  4. You will not be able to get your buddy to the point of seeing; God will have to accomplish it.
  5. If this is the case, you will want others to see Him as well.
  6. It is imperative that you inform others if you see Him, even if they do not believe.
  7. Oh, if only I could express what I’ve witnessed!
  8. Please forward this devotional to a friend.
  9. Disciples, to be sure, 389 L

What These 2 Saw Is Nothing Short Of Amazing

What do you believe Jesus’ physical appearance is? We’ve all given it some thought, and I’m confident that our particular upbringing has had a role in defining His characteristics. These two children, on the other hand, had radically different situations in which they saw Jesus. And the fact that their descriptions are exactly the same is truly astounding! In any case, there’s a young man named Colton Burpo who doesn’t have any doubts because he’s witnessed Him firsthand. At the age of 14, Colton died and was resurrected in paradise.

He saw Jesus (as well as many other members of his family) and returned to this world with a powerful witness to share.

Colton has characterized Jesus as having “brown hair, a brown beard, and a very brilliant grin – the brightest that I’ve ever seen” in addition to “a very bright smile – the brightest that I’ve ever seen.” And his eyes were a stunning shade of blue, like the sea.” Following Colton’s reported encounter, his family spent years attempting to locate a visual that fitted the description provided by him.

  1. However, it wasn’t until 2006, when Glenn Beck highlighted a teenage prodigy called Akiane Kramarik, from Illinois, on his CNN show that the family discovered what they had been seeking for all this time.
  2. Akiane is a painter and poet who lives in the United States.
  3. Furthermore, one of those paintings, named “Prince of Peace,” which is a picture of Christ, was incorporated in a film package that played on Beck’s television show.
  4. And Colton was in agreement.
  5. “” Not to mention the fact that Colton and Akiane have had such comparable experiences despite never having met each other previously.
  6. However, Akiane was raised by atheists and has never attended a single service at a church in her whole life.
  7. Many specifics from their encounters with God are shared by these two young individuals.

There are a few verses here and there, but they’re all a little disjointed.

“You know you have to trust God.

But what is it like in heaven?

However, there is very little in the way of specifics.” And that wasn’t the end of it for him.

It’s a little more definite.

In this video, you can see the CNN story about Akiane Kramarik and her wonderful paintings. Colton’s tale has also been made into a movie, which is currently in theaters.

For another great story about God,click here!

Image courtesy of YouTube courtesy of HTTheBlaze

The Case for Christ: What’s the evidence for the resurrection?

Strobel, a writer for the Chicago Tribune and a Yale Law School graduate, wrote “The Case for Christ: A Journalist’s Personal Investigation of the Evidence for Jesus” in 1998, which was released in English and Spanish. Strobel had previously been an atheist, but after his wife’s conversion to evangelical Christianity, he felt obligated to challenge some of the central Christian claims about Jesus. While the historicity of Jesus’ resurrection was the most important of these assertions, additional claims included the belief in Jesus as the actual Son of God and the veracity of the New Testament literature, among others.

It went on to become one of the most widely read and widely distributed works of Christian apologetic (that is, a defense of the rationality and correctness of Christianity) in history.

The film makes an attempt to present a persuasive argument for the historical accuracy of Jesus’ resurrection.

Are all of Strobel’s arguments relevant?

‘The Case for Christ: A Journalist’s Personal Investigation of the Evidence for Jesus’ was written by Lee Strobel, a writer for the Chicago Tribune and a Yale Law School graduate, in 1998. Strobel had previously been an atheist, but after his wife’s conversion to evangelical Christianity, he felt forced to challenge some of the most fundamental Christian claims concerning Jesus and his disciples. The historicity of Jesus’ resurrection was the most important of these assertions, but others included the belief in Jesus as the actual Son of God and the veracity of the New Testament writings, among other things.

It went on to become one of the most widely read and bestselling books of Christian apologetic (that is, a defense of the rationality and correctness of Christianity) in the world at any given time.

An attempt is made in the film to build a persuasive argument for the historical accuracy of Jesus’ resurrection.

According to my opinion as a religious studies professor who specializes in the New Testament and early Christianity, both the book and the film version of Strobel’s book have failed to establish the historical validity of Jesus’ resurrection for a variety of reasons.

What do the New Testament writings prove?

One significant point in the movie comes from the New Testament book known as First Corinthians, written by the Apostle Paul to a group of Christians in Corinth to resolve conflicts that had developed in their society. Paul is believed to have written this letter in the year 52, around 20 years after the death of Jesus. In 1 Corinthians 15:3-8, Paul provides a list of the persons who have seen the resurrected Jesus in their lives. The New Testament is a book of scripture that was written in the first century AD.

  • Many academics think that Paul is referring from a far older Christian faith, which may have formed only a few years after Jesus’ death and was adopted by the church.
  • Indeed, many New Testament scholars would agree that some of Jesus’ disciples believed they had seen him alive only a few weeks or months after his death, and that this belief was supported by other witnesses.
  • It is not uncommon for people to experience visions of their deceased relatives: Thirteen percent of those polled in a research of over 20,000 people claimed to have seen the dead.
  • To put it another way, sightings of the rising Jesus are not nearly as uncommon as Strobel would have us believe they are.

A miracle or not?

But what about the 500 persons who witnessed Jesus’ resurrection at the same time? First and foremost, biblical scholars are baffled as to what incident Paul is alluding to in this passage. The “day of Pentecost” (Acts 2:1) is thought to be a reference to the Holy Spirit bestowing supernatural abilities on members of the Christian community in Jerusalem, allowing them to communicate in languages that were previously unknown to them. However, according to one major researcher, this incident was added to the list of resurrection appearances by Paul, and the origins of the event remain unclear.

  • Second, even if Paul is reporting truthfully, his claims are no more credible than those of vast numbers of individuals who claim to have witnessed an apparition of the Virgin Mary or a UFO.
  • The fact that Jesus’ tomb was empty on Easter morning, according to Strobel, is the greatest explanation for this event.
  • There is substantial evidence to suggest that the Romans did not generally remove victims from crosses after they had died in battle.
  • But even if we believe that the tomb was indeed empty that morning, what evidence do we have that it was a miracle rather than the corpse of Christ being moved for unknown reasons?

Miracles are, by definition, exceedingly improbable events, and I see no reason to believe that one has occurred when alternative explanations are considerably more likely to be correct.

Who are the experts?

Aside from all of the obvious flaws in Strobel’s presentation, I feel that Strobel has made no genuine effort to include a diverse range of academic viewpoints in his presentation. As part of the film, Strobel travels across the country, interviewing scholars and other professionals about the historical significance of Jesus’ resurrection. In his book, Strobel describes the experts he interviewed as “renowned scholars and authority who have impeccable academic credentials.” The movie does not explain how Strobel selected the experts he interviewed.

“We affirm that the Bible, both Old and New Testaments, though written by men, was supernaturally inspired by God so that all of its words are written true revelation of God; it is therefore inerrant in the originals and authoritative in all matters,” states the faculty application for Liberty University, for example.

Many of the other experts he interviews for his book have connections that are comparable to his own.

(I believe there are around 10,000 professional biblical scholars in the world at this time.) His arguments for the historicity of Jesus’ resurrection were compelling, according to an email response I received in response to my query regarding whether most professional biblical academics would find his arguments persuasive.

Furthermore, Dr.

At the end of the day, though, each individual must come to his or her own conclusion on the Christ case.

No compelling evidence

I feel that Strobel has made no genuine effort to provide a diverse range of scholarly viewpoints, in addition to all of the other flaws in his presentation. On his journey across the country, Strobel speaks with professors and other experts about the historical significance of Jesus’ resurrection. In his book, Strobel describes the experts he spoke with as “renowned scholars and authority who have excellent academic credentials.” The movie does not explain how Strobel selected the experts he interviewed.

For example, the Liberty University faculty application requires agreement with the following statement: “We affirm that the Bible, both Old and New Testaments, though written by men, was supernaturally inspired by God so that all of its words are written true revelation of God; as a result, it is inerrant in the originals and authoritative in every matter.” It is not obligatory to sign such statements of faith by the vast majority of professional biblical scholars who teach in the United States and other places.

He has comparable links to many of the other scholars with whom he speaks in his book.

There are around 10,000 professional biblical scholars in the world, according to my estimation.

Continuing, Strobel stated, “As you are aware, there are several qualified academics who would agree that the evidence for Christ’s death and resurrection is adequate to demonstrate the historical validity of the event.” Furthermore, Dr.

But in the end, each individual must come to their own conclusion about the argument for Christ. The way someone interprets the evidence is influenced by a variety of factors, including, for example, whether or not the individual has an anti-supernatural prejudice.”

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