How Did Jesus Fulfill The Covenant With Abraham

How Jesus Fulfills the Abrahamic Covenant

And if you are Christ’s, you are Abraham’s descendants, heirs according to the promise. Galatians 3:29 (Galatians 3:29 [Galatians 3:29]) At Christmas, it’s likely that we don’t give much thought to how the birth of Jesus fulfills the Abrahamic Covenant, which is understandable. This extraordinary relationship between God and Abraham is marked by the promise of three things to Abraham: land, seed, and a blessing. Genesis 12:1-3 are the first three chapters of the book of Genesis. After that, the Lord told Abram, “Depart from your nation, your family, and your father’s home, and journey to the place that I will show you.” And I will create of you a large country, and I will bless you and make your name famous, so that you will be a blessing to others as well as yourself.

God has always desired to share our lives with us.

In this place, Abraham (the new Adam) would live with God and his descendants.

This Seed would be the one who brought the covenant to fruition.

  1. In order to bless others, God promised Abraham that he would be blessed in order to be a blessing himself.
  2. Were these promises intended only for Abraham’s own benefit?
  3. Is this covenant intended to be seen just in terms of physical reality, or does it also have a spiritual component?
  4. The Bible says that if you are Christ’s, you are Abraham’s progeny (seed).” Let’s take a look at each of the three aspects of the Abrahamic Covenant once more, but this time with a focus on how they relate to Christ.
  5. Hebrews 11:10 is a verse that states that Abraham was eagerly anticipating the construction of a city with eternal foundations, a city that had been created and constructed by God.
  6. His eternal abode would not be on this planet.
  7. All of this is made possible because of Jesus.

He represents the promised land.

2:7).

It is our ancestors’ legacy.

He has taken up residence in our hearts (Eph.

It is predicted that the physical world will be replaced by the New Earth, and that we shall dwell with Jesus for all eternity.

Celebrating our actual inheritance—Christ himself—is at the heart of the holiday season.

In the same way that Isaac’s birth was miraculous, Jesus’ birth was miraculous in order to fulfill the covenant established with Abraham and to fulfill every promise that God has ever given to people.

The promises were made to Abraham and to the descendants of Abraham.

The fulfillment of the Abrahamic promises was witnessed by Paul in Christ.

God told Abraham that he would be the father of a mighty nation.

Yes, I’m referring to the nation of Israel.

Take another look at our Fighter Verse.

I’m not a member of the Jewish faith.

This is made possible by Christ, and for the benefit of Christ.

A new country made up of the spiritual children of Abraham and Jesus has been established.

By now, you should be able to predict where this is going: Jesus is the blessing.

At the very least, not indefinitely.

In this case, he is the one who would be given birth to a woman, born without sin, and given the opportunity to die.

There has been no other offspring who has done this for us.

Not only did he die, but he also lost his whole life.

We have every spiritual blessing because of Christ (Eph.

How?

This implies that we have all we require for life and godliness (2 Peter 1:3).

It is also about the spirit of giving.

These are shadows that are cast on the ground. The genuine benefit comes from Jesus’ death and subsequent indwelling life. Have you been blessed by the holiday season? Have you received the promise offered to Abraham, which has been fulfilled through the person and work of Jesus Christ?

6. The Fulfillment Of The Abrahamic Covenant

In addition, if you are Christ’s, you are Abraham’s descendants and heirs according to the promise. In Galatians 3:29, the apostle Paul says, “Therefore, because you have believed, you have not denied the truth.” At Christmas, it’s likely that we don’t give much thought to how the birth of Jesus fulfills the Abrahamic Covenant, which is a shame. The Abrahamic Covenant is a remarkable connection between God and Abraham, in which God promises Abraham three things: land, seed, and blessings. 12:1-3 are the first three chapters of Genesis.

  • As a result, I will create you a great country, and I will bless you and exalt your name, so that you will be a blessing to others.
  • Throughout history, God has desired to share our lives.
  • During his stay in this place, Abraham (the new Adam) would live with God.
  • he would be blessed with a large number of children This Seed would be the one who brought the covenant to fruition!
  • In order to help others, God promised Abraham that he would be blessed in return.
  • Is it possible that these promises were just intended for Abraham personally.
  • Is this covenant intended to be seen just in terms of physical reality, or does it also have a spiritual component?

You are Abraham’s children (seed) if Christ is your Lord and Saviour.

Land Even Abraham came to know that the home he longed for was more than a physical reality; it was also a spiritual reality.

(NLT) As long as Abraham lived in tents, he was certain that God would construct the ultimate city.

What we know as the New Earth will be home to a New Jerusalem, which will be created by God and where He will live with us eternally, as we know it now.

In addition, Jesus is our permanent residence for the time being.

Because of him, we are firmly planted and strengthened (Col.

We have received the promised possession in Jesus Christ.

In our hearts, He resides (Eph.

It is anticipated that the physical world will be replaced by the New Earth, and that we shall dwell with Jesus for all eternity.

During Christmas, we commemorate the birth of Christ, who is our rightful heir.

Isaac’s miraculous birth inspired Jesus to be born in order to fulfill the covenant established with Abraham and to fulfill every promise that God has ever made to mankind.

“And to seeds,” which implies a large number of people, is replaced by “and to your seed,” which implies a single individual, namely Christ.

He is the Seed who will bring all of God’s promises to fulfillment.

Was this physically accomplished?

Didn’t Christ, in creating a holy nation and a new royal priesthood (1 Peter 2:9), bring this prophecy to fruition for God’s glory?

Each of us is a part of Abraham’s “seed.” How?

The truth is, if we are united with Jesus as our Savior, we are Abraham’s spiritual seed of faith.

Providing God with a large family is the essence of Christmas.

Blessing According to God’s promise to Abraham, every country on the face of the planet will be blessed via his descendants.

All of Isaac’s sons and daughters—Jacob, Judah, David, and Solomon—are cursed.

Him who would be born to a woman, born without sin, and born to die is the one who has been waiting for this moment.

This has never been done before by any of our other children or grandchildren.

Not only was he killed, but he was also taken from his body.

The blessings of God are all ours in Christ (Eph.

How?

The implication is that we have all we require for life and godliness (2 Peter 1:3).

These are shadows that are cast across the ground. His death and indwelling life are the genuine blessings, as is his resurrection. Christmas has brought you good fortune, have you? What part of Abraham’s promise did you receive, and how did it come to be fulfilled in Jesus Christ?

Analysis of the Covenant

Several elements of the Abrahamic covenant are stated in Genesis 12:2, 3, in terms of their primary reasons. In the name of God, I will create of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee and make thy name famous; and be thou a blessing: and I will bless those who bless thee, and I will curse him who curseth thee: and in thee will all the families of the world be blessed.” As numerous writers have pointed out, this covenant has seven clauses, which are as follows: (1) The promise of a great nation through Abraham; (2) Abraham’s personal blessing; (3) the name of Abraham shall be great; (4) Abraham is to be a blessing to others; (5) blessing will rest on those who bless Abraham; (6) a curse will rest on those who curse Abraham; (7) all nations of the earth will be blessed through Abraham; and (8) the name of Abraham shall be great.

Among the many aspects of the original covenant, four stand out: (1) the national promises made to Israel; (2) the personal promises made to Abraham; (3) the principle of blessing or cursing upon nations other than Israel based on their attitude toward Abraham and his seed; and (4) the promise of universal blessing through Abraham, which was fulfilled through the death of Jesus Christ.

According to Genesis 13:14-17, Abraham is granted ownership of all of “the land that thou seest,” “forever,” and the promise about his offspring is enhanced by the fact that he would get a number of descendants similar in number to the dust of the earth.

Additional essential provisions are established in Genesis 17:1-18, including the following: (1) The agreement has been solemnly ratified by the court.

(3) The offspring of Abraham will inherit the throne of Israel.

The offspring of Abraham is established in a particular and intimate connection with God, in which God pledges to “be their God,” which means “be their father.” The Abrahamic covenant not only includes many of the most important aspects of God’s plan for the ages, but it also serves as the foundation for a large number of future covenants.

The agreement with regard to the future kings who would descend from Abraham is given a specific turn in the promises made to David in the Davidic covenant, which are related to his kingdom and line of descent from Abraham.

The covenant with regard to spiritual benefits on the descendants of Abraham and “all the families of the world” is the central topic of the prophets, who depict not just blessing on the Gentiles via Christ, but also the regathering and blessing of the nation Israel in their writings (cf.

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The Abrahamic Covenant serves as the foundation for all of these covenants, and it is for this reason that the principles shown in its fulfillment and the content of its revelation serve as one of the most essential deciding elements in all of prophecy.

It is acceptable to state that all systems of prophetic interpretation, particularly those that deal with unfulfilled prophecy, are characterized by their stance toward the Abrahamic covenant, which determines its major characteristics.

Historic Fulfillment of the Covenant

Genesis 12:2, 3 define the requirements of the Abrahamic covenant in terms of their primary components. It says, “I will create of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and I will exalt thy name, and I will make thee a blessing; and I will bless those who bless thee, and I will exalt the name of him who curseth thee: and in thee will all the families of the world be blessed.” There are seven stipulations to this covenant, as numerous commentators have pointed out. (1) the promise of a great nation through Abraham; (2) Abraham’s personal blessing; (3) the name of Abraham shall be great; (4) Abraham is to be a blessing to others; (5) blessing will rest on those who bless Abraham; (6) a curse will rest on those who curse Abraham; (7) all nations of the earth will be blessed through Abraham; and (8) the name of Abraham shall be great.

  1. In later revelations of Scripture, the Abrahamic covenant was enlarged and expanded in detail even further.
  2. Rather than via Eliezer, Abraham’s servant, the line of the seed is established in Genesis 15:1-7, and the promise of land is reiteratively re-stated.
  3. The covenant is solemnly reaffirmed in this manner: Secondly, the name Abraham is given to Abram as a sign of the promise that he will be the father of many countries — that is, of nations other than the nation who will inherit the land — and that he will be the father of many descendants.
  4. The offspring of Abraham were granted “all the land of Canaan” as “an eternal possession,” according to Genesis 12:4.
  5. Although the Abrahamic covenant includes many of the most important aspects of God’s plan for all of time, its foundation provides a solid foundation for many more covenants to follow.
  6. The agreement with regard to the future kings who would descend from Abraham is given a specific turn in the promises made to David in the Davidic covenant, which are related to his kingdom and line of descent from David.
  7. The covenant with regard to spiritual benefits on the descendants of Abraham and “all the families of the world” is the central topic of the prophets, who depict not just blessing on the Gentiles via Christ, but also the re-gathering and blessing upon the nation Israel as well (cf.
  8. This covenant serves as the foundation for all other covenants, and as a result, the principles shown in its fulfillment and the substance of its revelation serve as one of the most essential deciding elements in the fulfillment and revelation of all other prophecies as well.

Without a doubt, all systems of prophetic interpretation, particularly those that deal with unfulfilled prophecy, are characterized by an attitude toward the Abrahamic covenant, which determines its primary characteristics.

The Fulfillment of the Promises

The stipulations of the Abrahamic covenant are detailed in Genesis 12:2, 3 in terms of their primary components. “I will create of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and I will magnify thy name; and be thou a blessing: and I will bless those who bless thee, and I will curse him who curseth thee: and in thee will all the families of the world be blessed.” As several commentators have pointed out, this covenant has seven provisions: (1) The promise of a great nation through Abraham; (2) personal blessing on Abraham; (3) the name of Abraham shall be great; (4) Abraham is to be a blessing to others; (5) blessing will rest on those who bless Abraham; (6) a curse will rest on those who curse Abraham; (7) all nations of the earth will be blessed through Abraham Four aspects of the original covenant stand out: (1) the national promises made to Israel; (2) the personal promises made to Abraham; (3) the principle of blessing or cursing upon nations other than Israel based on their attitude toward Abraham and his seed; and (4) the promise of universal blessing through Abraham, which was fulfilled through Christ.

In later revelations of Scripture, the Abrahamic covenant was expanded and given greater clarity.

Rather than via Eliezer, Abraham’s servant, the line of the seed is established in Genesis 15:1-7, and the promise of land is reaffirmed.

Secondly, the name Abraham is given to Abram as a sign of the promise that he will be the father of many countries – that is, of nations other than the one which will inherit the land – and that he will be the father of many descendants.

(4) “All of Canaan” is handed to Abraham’s descendants as “an eternal possession.” (5) God establishes a personal and particular connection with the offspring of Abraham, in which God promises to “be their God.” Not only does the Abrahamic covenant include many of the most important aspects of God’s plan for the ages, but it also serves as the foundation for many other covenants to come.

The covenant with regard to the future kings who would descend from Abraham is given a specific turn in the promises made to David in the Davidic covenant, which are related to his kingdom and line of descent from him.

The covenant with regard to spiritual benefits on the descendants of Abraham and “all the families of the world” is the topic of the prophets, who depict not just blessing on the Gentiles via Christ, but also the regathering and blessing upon the people Israel (cf.

The Abrahamic Covenant serves as the foundation for all of these covenants, and as a result, the principles shown in its fulfillment and the content of its revelation serve as one of the most essential deciding factors in all of prophecy.

It is acceptable to state that all systems of prophetic interpretation, particularly those that deal with unfulfilled prophecy, are characterized by their stance toward the Abrahamic covenant, which determines its primary characteristics.

6 Covenants Fulfilled in Christ

During this time of year when we celebrate Easter, it’s vital to remember that the Gospel account of Christ’s death on the cross is the culmination of a salvation plan that God had promised His people from the beginning of time. God formed covenants of grace throughout Scripture, each one revealing more and more about His perfect purpose to make us His people and to be our God as each one was fulfilled. God formed covenants of grace throughout Scripture, each one revealing more and more about His perfect purpose to make us His people and to be our God as each one was fulfilled.

  1. a prophecy that a descendant of Adam would bring about triumph A love connection between God and Adam and Eve, the part of creation that He created in His image, was established during the Garden of Eden eons ago.
  2. Furthermore, the Almighty God humbled Himself in so that humans would come to know Him intimately.
  3. God, despite their disloyalty, remained steadfast in his promises.
  4. Genesis 6:9-22, 9:1-17 |A pledge to preserve mankind and, as a result, the coming Son of Adam is contained in this covenant.
  5. However, because iniquity and violence had grown widespread, God picked Noah to be like a new Adam on a new world (9:1, 7)—not a redeemed earth nor a redeemed Adam, but a man who would protect mankind from extinction.
  6. THE ABRAHAMIC TERMITE CONTRACT GENESIS 12:1-3, 15:1-21, 17:1-27 |
  7. By way of a miracle birth, a promise to benefit all nations was made.

Besides the land of Canaan, God promised Abraham that it would be his descendants’s forever, pointing us toward a future Kingdom without end—one that, through Abraham, would bless all nations on the planet.

FROM MOSESEXODUS 19-31 |A vow to not forsake His people—and the fulfillment of that pledge would be a once-for all sacrifice on the cross.

They were then given the Law, which was followed by the construction of the tabernacle and the offering of ceremonial sacrifices, which all demonstrated the futility of combating sin aside from the intervention of God.

This covenant pointed them to the incredible grace of God in His longsuffering with them, as well as fostering a yearning for the coming of the promised Savior to save them from their sins (Genesis 3:15).

SAMUEL 7:1-16 |

When David returned to Jerusalem with the ark of the covenant, God made an incredible promise to him: He would set David’s reign eternally before Him.

THE NEW TERMS OF THE AGREEMENT HEBREWS 8-9 |

A promise to redeem for all time everyone who call on the name of Jesus, so establishing them as God’s chosen ones.

According to the promise, Jesus, God with us, humbled Himself by becoming a man and taking on human flesh (Genesis 3:15).

He totally fulfilled the Law (Hebrews 4:15), and then He shed His own blood to purify everyone who call on His name from their sins, so that they may serve the living God (Hebrews 10:12).

(Hebrews 9:14). In the end, He triumphed over sin and death for all time, and He will return to lead His people into the new Promised Land, where God will dwell with them (Revelation 21). In this FREE eBook, you will learn more about the prophesies that Christ fulfilled.

Advent: Jesus Fulfilled the Abrahamic Covenant

The Gospel tale of Christ’s death on the cross, as we celebrate Easter, should serve as a reminder that God’s salvation plan, which has been promised to His people since the beginning of time, has now been fulfilled. God forged covenants of grace throughout Scripture, each one revealing more and more about His perfect purpose to make us His people and to be our God as each new covenant was established and fulfilled. God forged covenants of grace throughout Scripture, each one revealing more and more about His perfect purpose to make us His people and to be our God as each new covenant was established and fulfilled.

  • In exchange for their labor, he gave them with a lovely garden, nice food, and one another.
  • He provided them with clear guidelines for living in His presence, but Adam and Eve rejected His knowledge and love, enabling sin to take root in their hearts.
  • As a result of His unfathomable compassion, the great I am promised all mankind triumph over Satan and sin via the arrival of a Savior—a child descended from Adam and Eve—who would not only crush the head of Satan but would also be struck down by the same disease.
  • God needed to nurture and safeguard people in order for God’s prior promise to be fulfilled.
  • So that the Seed of Eve would be born and fulfill the covenant of redemption, God assured that it would happen.
  • GENESIS 12:1-3, 15, 21, and 27 |
  • God cried out to Abraham in the middle of a glory-hungry culture (Genesis 11:1-9), telling him that he would miraculously furnish him with a son through whom Abraham would father nations and empires.
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In countless instances, God showed Abraham that this covenant would not be broken since it was God who promised these things would be fulfilled via His own blood, not Abraham himself.

Then He provided them with the Law, as well as the tabernacle and its ritual sacrifices, all of which attested to the futility of combating sin without from God’s help and intervention.

This covenant pointed them to the incredible grace of God in His longsuffering with them, and it cultivated a yearning for the coming of the promised Savior (Genesis 3:15).

2 SAMUEL 7:1-16 a prophecy that the everlasting King and Savior would be descended from the House of David The march of time brought to the establishment of God’s chosen monarch over His people: David, who was described as “a king after His own heart” (1 Samuel 13:14).

When David’s sons erred, God would reprimand them.

COVENANT OF THE FUTURE THE BOOK OF EZEKIEL 8-9 |

A promise to redeem for all time everyone who call on the name of Jesus, so establishing them as God’s chosen people It was at last the arrival of King Jesus, Savior, perfect sacrifice for the forgiveness of sins forever, who fulfilled each and every covenant.

David’s son, he descended from Abraham’s lineage (Matthew 1:1-17).

(Hebrews 9:14). In the end, He triumphed over sin and death for all time, and He will return to lead His people into the new Promised Land, where God will dwell with them (Revelation 21). This FREE eBook contains further information on the predictions that Christ fulfilled.

Reflection

Yahweh is a God of promises, and He is faithful to His word. Genesis 15:1-5 is the first in a series of chapters that chronicle the promises that God made to Abraham. This was more than just a promise for a large number of children and ethnic descendants. God told Abraham that he would be “the father of a multiplicity of nations” on several occasions (Genesis 17:4-5). God established a covenant with Abraham that would be extended to his descendants. All who place their faith in Jesus Christ as Lord are given the privilege of being adopted as sons of the Father.

What could be more enticing than that?

Isaac was the first representation of the promise.

In Yahweh’s character, He makes promises that He keeps. It is recorded in Genesis 15:1-5 that Abraham was promised many things, and this is the first of multiple accounts of these promises. For a large number of children and ethnic offspring, this was more than just a promise to keep. God told Abraham that he would be “the father of a multiplicity of nations” on several occasions throughout history (Genesis 17:4-5). It was with Abraham that God created a covenant that would be carried on through his descendants to this day.

“I shall be their God,” the Lord says (Genesis 17:8).

We need this covenant of grace.

Because we are unable to meet the terms of the covenant with God, Christ took on our place and completed them for us. For the Israelites, covenant keeping was about more than just the physical evidence of circumcision. It all came down to having hearts that were entirely surrendered to the Lord. In order to maintain the purity and holiness of this covenant, God recognized that it would need more than bodily obedience – it would take the obedience of faith (in Christ). “ ‘My father!’ Isaac said to his father Abraham, his grandfather.

  1. “Behold, the fire and the wood, but where is the lamb for a burned offering?” he said, looking around.
  2. In order to save time, they went together.
  3. Abraham had faith in God, and he had faith in God’s plan.
  4. Thank God that we are not saved by our capacity to obey God’s law, but rather by the perfect blood of Jesus, which covers our inability to keep God’s commandments.
  5. Christ, on the other hand, reaffirmed the promises of the Old Testament since His Word never fails (Romans 15:8).
  6. God remains true in the face of our sin and continues to draw His people to Himself.

(See also John 1:29). It is now possible to be forgiven of one’s misdeeds. Jesus Christ is the heavenly covenant keeper who ensures that we will live forever in the presence of the Father. God provided the Lamb as a sacrifice for His people.

Application

  1. God makes promises and follows through on them. Keep this in mind on a daily basis. It is essential that we read and study God’s Word in order to be able to identify (with the guidance of the Holy Spirit) which promises are applicable to us at this time. It is certain that God gave the Lamb for our atonement
  2. Don’t forget to read the Old Testament aloud as a group to ensure that you understand everything. The God of the Old Testament is the same God of the New Testament. Everything in the Old Testament leads forward to the coming of Jesus the Messiah. Everything in the New Testament, as well as the Old Testament, refers both backward to Christ’s first Advent and ahead to His second Advent. We have the advantage of being able to reflect back on the promises that the Lord has previously brought to pass. Trust that He would also follow through on the promises He made while on earth. Some of Jesus’ sayings were “I will not abandon you” (John 14:18). “I will never leave you nor forsake you,” says the Bible’s Hebrews 13:5.

Prayer

Father, thank you for offering the sacrifice of the Lamb of God to atone for my sins. I am undeserving of your love, and I am unworthy of the promises you have made to me. But I thank you for the fact that your righteousness and holy love are not contingent on my capacity to love and follow you and your commands. We are grateful that you sent Jesus to live a faultless, obedient, and worshipful life on my behalf because I am unable to do so. However, Lord Jesus, please give me the joy and thankfulness to live a life of appreciative worship that gives you honor in order to fulfill your will.

Family Discipleship Time

  • I’m grateful to you, Father, for offering the sacrifice of the Lamb of God for my sin. I am undeserving of your love, and I am unworthy of the promises you have made to me.” The fact that your righteousness and holy love are not dependent on my capacity to love and follow you is a source of great joy to me. God, thank you for sending Jesus to live a flawless, obedient, and worshipful life on my behalf because I am unable to do so. But grant me the joy and appreciation to live a life of appreciative worship that gives you honor, Lord Jesus, and I will do so. You have done a wonderful thing by adopting me and including me in your covenant promise.

Additional Resources

  • Father, thank you for making the Lamb of God available for my redemption. I am undeserving of your love, and I am unworthy of the promises you make to me. Nevertheless, I am thankful to you that your righteousness and holy love are not contingent on my capacity to love and follow you. Thank you for sending Jesus to live the flawless, obedient, and worshipful life that I am unable to live. However, Lord Jesus, please give me the joy and thankfulness to live a life of appreciative worship that gives you honor in order to bring you glory. You have done a wonderful thing by adopting me as your kid and including me in your covenant vow.

Free Advent Bible Study (2022)

Let us take a step back and wonder at God’s grace and sovereignty, and let us center our attention on God this Christmas. It is our hope that we will join the angels in chanting, “Glory to God in the highest” (Luke 2:14). We invite you to join us on this 25-day Advent journey as we worship Christ and celebrate his birth. Subscribe to receive resources, podcast episodes, and SWO updates delivered straight to your email every week.

The Need for Jesus (Part 4): The Second Adam

Take a step back and wonder at God’s grace and sovereignty, and keep God at the forefront of our thoughts and actions during this Christmas season. As the angels sing, may we join them in exalting God in the highest (Luke 2:14). We invite you to join us on this 25-day Advent journey as we worship Christ and celebrate his arrival. Subscribe to receive materials, podcast episodes, and SWO updates delivered straight to your email every month.

What is the Abrahamic Covenant?

Let us take a step back and wonder at God’s grace and sovereignty, and let us keep our attention on God this Christmas. It is our prayer that we would join the angels in singing, “Glory to God in the highest” (Luke 2:14). Join us on this 25-day Advent journey as we worship Christ and celebrate his arrival. Subscribe to receive materials, podcast episodes, and SWO updates delivered straight to your inbox every day.

Genesis 12

Let us take a step back and wonder at God’s grace and sovereignty, and let us keep God at the center of our Christmas celebrations. May we join along with the angels in singing, “Glory to God in the highest” (Luke 2:14). Join us on this 25-day Advent journey as we worship Christ and celebrate his birth. Receive materials, podcast episodes, and SWO updates delivered straight to your email.

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Origins of Abrahamic Covenant

Let us take a step back and wonder at God’s grace and sovereignty, and let us center our attention on God this Christmas. It is our hope that we will join the angels in chanting, “Glory to God in the highest” (Luke 2:14). We invite you to join us on this 25-day Advent journey as we worship Christ and celebrate his birth. Subscribe to receive resources, podcast episodes, and SWO updates delivered straight to your email every week.

Genesis 17

With the symbol of circumcision, the promise is confirmed later on in Genesis 17 with a concrete manifestation. Abraham and his son, Ishmael, are circumcised, making it apparent that they, as well as their entire household, have been set apart for the service of the Lord.

Affirming Abraham’s covenant and making a promise to Abraham’s offspring, and then to all of the nations via Abraham, is truly the beginning of the covenant of grace, which will be fulfilled in the person of Jesus Christ.

3 Tenets of the Abrahamic Covenant

1. To make Abraham the father of a large nation, to bless Abraham and magnify his name so that he will be a blessing, to bless those who bless him and curse those who curse him, and to bless all peoples on earth by Abraham’s sacrifice. 2. To grant Abraham’s descendants complete ownership of the country stretching from the Nile River to the Euphrates. Later on, this country came to be known as the Promised Land or the Land of Israel, depending on who you ask. 3. To make Abraham the father of many nations and numerous offspring, as well as to provide his descendants “the entire country of Canaan.” The act of circumcision is intended to serve as a permanent reminder of this eternal covenant with Abraham and his male offspring for all time.

The Purpose of the Abrahamic Covenant and Its Fulfillment

In the Abrahamic Covenant, the Lord promised a covenant to three generations of people: Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and he reiterated the covenant pledge to each generation. All three had been given land, a large number of progeny, and a blessing from God. Abram was summoned out of Ur of the Chaldees and brought to Canaan, where the Lord formed a covenant with him and his descendants (Genesis 12:1-3). Isaac, Abraham’s son, was the subject of a covenant with the Lord that was confirmed by the Lord (Genesis 21:12; 26:3-4).

Dave Jenkins, God of Abraham, supplied the following excerpt: Consider the following examples to have a better understanding of the relevance of these points:

  • The Lord is separated from the gods of Egypt by the fact that he is the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Due to the fact that it was the offspring of the covenant who would inherit land, the Lord is referred to as the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. This land was intended to serve as a reminder to the Israelites of the covenant made with Abraham
  • Nevertheless, this did not happen. As recorded in Acts 3, Peter addresses the Jews gathered in the temple, reminding them that they are descended from the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. The apostles Peter and John heal a crippled man, and Peter credits this miracle to the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and praises and glorifies Him (Acts 3:13–14). As a result of the miracle with the lame man (Acts 3:13), the Jews sent Jesus to Pilate for execution (Acts 3:15), setting up a dramatic contrast. Peter further informs his audience that the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob is fulfilling the covenant that Abraham made with the people of Israel (Acts 3:25). In his plan for the centuries, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob includes the Lord Jesus, who gives forgiveness for sins and reconciliation with God
  • God summoned Abram and blessed him, setting in action a plan that was completed when Jesus died and rose again
  • The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob blessed all of the nations of the globe
  • The God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob blessed all of the nations of the world

How Does God’s Promise to Abraham Affect the Whole World?

During the appearance of the Lord to Abraham in Genesis 12, the Lord made a number of promises to Abraham. His promises included the promise that God would bless Abraham, the promise that God would establish a great nation out of Abraham, and the promise that God would bring blessing to all of the nations of the earth via Abraham. As we read from Genesis 12 onward, we can see that God is beginning to carry out the promises made in the covenant with Abraham. The benefits and promises are concentrated on Abraham individually at the outset of the story.

  • Despite the fact that Sarah is past the typical age for giving birth to children, God performs a miracle and Isaac is born.
  • Now, when Abraham’s descendants started to multiply, we witness God’s hand upon them, as we read in the book of Exodus, for example.
  • He unites the descendants of Israel to form a kingdom under his rule.
  • After a long period of time, we are now beginning to notice the benefit spreading beyond Israeli boundaries.
  • As they are going into the land of Canaan and beginning the conquest of the land, for example, we have a lady named Rahab who comes to know God and is rewarded as a result of her decision to convert her allegiance from her old God to the God of Israel while the Israelites are in the land.
  • For the time being, however, the completeness and the benefit of how all of the planet is going to be blessed via Abraham will not be realized until the birth of Jesus Christ, in significant part.
  • The Lord Jesus Christ reigns as Savior and Lord of the entire globe.
  • In the Book of Acts, we witness that tale unfolding as the gospel makes its way across Israel, as the gospel makes its way to the Samaritans, and as the gospel begins to make its way beyond the confines of the Jewish state.

Credit for the image: iStock/Getty Images Plus/sedmak

The Covenant Fulfilled

Today brings us to the conclusion of our brief examination of the covenants recorded in the Bible. In our last discussion, we noticed that the covenant of redemption serves as the foundation for all other covenants. A people was chosen by God, and the Son swore to complete their redemption. The Spirit promised to put redemption into action. This was the covenant of redemption. The covenant of works and the covenant of grace are the two most important agreements that God and man have formed with one another, as we have seen.

  • As we have seen, this covenant of grace is revealed via a series of sub-covenants with Noah, Abraham, Moses, David, and, eventually, Jesus, who is the culmination of the whole.
  • All of creation is brought into reconciliation with God via Christ, ensuring that God will never again be forced to wipe out all life on the planet by annihilation.
  • By making atonement for their sins, Christ transforms the people of God into the valued possession that Moses had instructed them to be in the first place.
  • Before we come to the end of our topic, we must point out something extremely significant.
  • Because of it, we are protected and rescued via its administration, not because of our own efforts, but rather because of the work of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.
  • This covenant of works, on the other hand, is not dependent on our efforts, but on the efforts of the Messiah.
  • Perfect obedience was still needed of us in order to be saved.
  • We who are in Christ are judged righteous by God’s favor and are permitted the life Adam was denied (1 Cor.
  • However, if our Lord had not earned this righteousness, it could not be granted to us.

Coram Deo

Today brings us to the conclusion of our brief examination of the covenants recorded in the Scriptures. In our discussion of the covenant of redemption, we highlighted that it serves as the foundation for all other covenants as well. In the covenant of redemption, the Father chose a people, the Son vowed to bring about their redemption, and the Spirit promised to put redemption into effect. The covenant of works and the covenant of grace are the two most important agreements that God and man have established with one another, as we’ve seen.

According to what we’ve seen so far, this covenant of grace is unfolded through a series of sub-covenants with Noah through Abraham through Moses through David and eventually with Jesus through his death and resurrection.

Christ is the one who reconciles all of creation to God, so assuring that God will never again be forced to wipe out all life on the planet by nuclear war.

Because Christ has atoned for the sins of the people of God, they have become the prized asset that Moses had instructed them to be.

There is one very crucial point to make before we come to the end of our discussion: In its relationship with us, the covenant of grace is solely generous.

However, when we examine the connection between the Father and the Son, we see that the covenant of grace is, in fact, a covenant of deeds as well as words.

God did not alter His mind about Adam’s failure to uphold the initial covenant of works.

We are saved because Jesus came and fulfilled the terms of the covenant of works. Our righteousness is established by grace, and we are permitted the life that Adam was denied (1 Cor. 15:22). However, if our Lord had not earned this righteousness, it could not be given to us.

For Further Study

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